#HackerEarth: #BattleOfBots 9: Taunt

Problem

Taunt is a two player board game which is played on a 10X4 grid of cells and is played on opposite sides of the game-board. Each player has an allocated color, Orange ( First Player ) or Green ( Second Player ) being conventional. Each player has nine piece in total. The players move their pieces towards to his / her opponent’s area by moving their pieces strategically. Each piece has a different moving feature and is one of the 3 types of pieces.

Piece 1: It can move to horizontally or vertically adjacent cell, if the cell doesn’t contain a piece of same color.

enter image description here

Piece 2: It can move to horizontally adjacent cell or can move two steps forward, if the cell doesn’t contain a piece of same color (except the piece itself).

enter image description here

This type of piece can move to its own position if its in the second last row of the grid and going downward or if its in the second row of the grid and going upward.

enter image description here

Piece 3: It can move two step diagonally in the forward direction, if the cell doesn’t contain a piece of same color (except the piece itself).

enter image description here enter image description here

This type of piece can move to its own position if its in the second last row of the grid and going downward or if its in the second row of the grid and going upward.

enter image description here

Players take turns involving moves of pieces as mentioned above and can captures opponent’s piece by jumping on or over opponent’s pieces.

Note: Forward direction for first player is downward and for second player is upward.

If a piece (except piece 1) is moving downward and touches the last row, its direction will change i.e. now it will move upward. Similarly, once if a piece (except piece 1) is moving upward and touches the first row, its direction will change i.e. now it will move downward.

Rules:

  • Player can only move according to the moves mentioned above.
  • A player may not move an opponent’s piece.
  • A player can captures opponent’s piece by jumping on or over opponent pieces.

The game will end after 100 moves ( 50 moves for each player ) or when any of the players don’t have any move left. At the end of the game the player with majority of pieces will win.

We will play it on an 10X4 grid. The top left of the grid is [0,0] and the bottom right is [9,3].

Input:
The input will be a 10X4 matrix consisting only of 0,1or2. Next line will contain an integer denoting the total number of moves till the current state of the board. Next line contains an integer – 1 or 2 which is your player id.

In the given matrix, top-left is [0,0] and bottom-right is [9,3]. The y-coordinate increases from left to right, and x-coordinate increases from top to bottom.

A cell is represented by 3 integers.

First integer denotes the player id (1 or 2).
Second integer denotes the type of piece (1, 2 or 3).
Third integer denotes the direction of the piece (0 (upward) or 1 (downward)). When the piece is of first type, direction doesn’t matter as the piece is free to move to horizontally or vertically adjacent cell, if the cell doesn’t contain a piece of same color.

Empty cell is represented by 000.

Output:
In the first line print the coordinates of the cell separated by space, the piece you want to move.
In second line print the coordinates of the cell in which the piece will jump.
You must take care that you don’t print invalid coordinates. For example, [1,1] might be a valid coordinate in the game play if the piece is able to jump to [1,1], but [9,10] will never be. Also if you play an invalid move or your code exceeds the time/memory limit while determining the move, you lose the game.

Starting state
The starting state of the game is the state of the board before the game starts.

131 131 131 121
121 121 111 111
111 000 000 000
000 000 000 000
000 000 000 000
000 000 000 000
000 000 000 000
000 000 000 210
210 210 220 220
220 230 230 230

First Input
This is the input give to the first player at the start of the game.

131 131 131 121
121 121 111 111
111 000 000 000
000 000 000 000
000 000 000 000
000 000 000 000
000 000 000 000
000 000 000 210
210 210 220 220
220 230 230 230
0
1

 

SAMPLE INPUT
000 000 000 000
000 000 000 111
000 000 111 130
000 000 000 000
000 000 000 000
000 220 000 000
131 000 000 000
121 000 210 000
000 210 131 000
000 210 000 000
58
1
SAMPLE OUTPUT
8 2
8 0

Explanation

This is player 1’s turn, and the player will move the piece at [8,2] and will take two steps diagonally in downward direction and will be at [8,0]
After his/her move the state of game becomes:

000 000 000 000
000 000 000 111
000 000 111 130
000 000 000 000
000 000 000 000
000 220 000 000
131 000 000 000
121 000 210 000
130 210 000 000
000 000 000 000
59
2

Note: Direction of the piece is also changed from 1 to 0 as the piece was moving downward and touches the last row. This state will be fed as input to program of player 2.

Here is the code of the default bot.

Time Limit:1.0 sec(s) for each input file.
Memory Limit:256 MB
Source Limit:1024 KB

Sample Game

Installing Apache UserGrid on linux

About the Project

Apache Usergrid is an open-source Backend-as-a-Service (BaaS or mBaaS) composed of an integrated distributed NoSQL database, application layer and client tier with SDKs for developers looking to rapidly build web and/or mobile applications. It provides elementary services and retrieval features like:

  • User Registration & Management
  • Data Storage
  • File Storage
  • Queues
  • Full Text Search
  • Geolocation Search
  • Joins

It is a multi-tenant system designed for deployment to public cloud environments (such as Amazon Web Services, Rackspace, etc.) or to run on traditional server infrastructures so that anyone can run their own private BaaS deployment.

For architects and back-end teams, it aims to provide a distributed, easily extendable, operationally predictable and highly scalable solution. For front-end developers, it aims to simplify the development process by enabling them to rapidly build and operate mobile and web applications without requiring backend expertise.

Usergrid 2.1.0 Deployment Guide

Though the Usergrid Deployment guide seems to be simple enough, I faced certain hiccups and it took me about 4 days to figure out what I was doing wrong.

This document explains how to deploy the Usergrid v2.1.0 Backend-as-a-Service (BaaS), which comprises the Usergrid Stack, a Java web application, and the Usergrid Portal, which is an HTML5/JavaScript application.

Prerequsites

Below are the software requirements for Usergrid 2.1.0 Stack and Portal. You can install them all on one computer for development purposes, and for deployment you can deploy them separately using clustering.

Linux or a UNIX-like system (Usergrid may run on Windows, but we haven’t tried it)

Download the Apache Usergrid 2.1.0 binary release from the official Usergrid releases page:

After untarring the files that you need for deploying Usergrid Stack and Portal are ROOT.war and usergrid-portal.tar.

Stack STEP #1: Setup Cassandra

As mentioned in prerequisites, follow the installation guide given in link

Usergrid uses Cassandra’s Thrift protocol
Before starting cassandra, on Cassandra 2.x releases you MUST enable Thrift by setting start_rpc in your cassandra.yaml file:

    #Whether to start the thrift rpc server.
    start_rpc: true

Note:DataStax no longer supports the DataStax Community version of Apache Cassandra or the DataStax Distribution of Apache Cassandra. It is best to follow the Apache Documentation

Once you are up and running make a note of these things:

  • The name of the Cassandra cluster
  • Hostname or IP address of each Cassandra node
    • in case of same machine as Usergrid, then localhost. Usergrid would then be running on single machine embedded mode.
  • Port number used for Cassandra RPC (the default is 9160)
  • Replication factor of Cassandra cluster

Stack STEP #2: Setup ElasticSearch

Usergrid also needs access to at least one ElasticSearch node. As with Cassandra, you can setup single ElasticSearch node on your computer, and you should run a cluster in production.

Steps:

  • Download and unzip Elasticsearch
  • Run bin/elasticsearch (or bin\elasticsearch -d on Linux as Background Process) (or bin\elasticsearch.bat on Windows)
  • Run curl http://localhost:9200/

Once you are up and running make a note of these things:

  • The name of the ElasticSearch cluster
  • Hostname or IP address of each ElasticSearch node
    • in case of same machine as Usergrid, then localhost. Usergrid would then be running on single machine embedded mode.
  • Port number used for ElasticSearch protocol (the default is 9200)

Stack STEP #3: Setup Tomcat

The Usergrid Stack is contained in a file named ROOT.war, a standard Java EE WAR ready for deployment to Tomcat. On each machine that will run the Usergrid Stack you must install the Java SE 8 JDK and Tomcat 7+.

Stack STEP #4: Configure Usergrid Stack

You must create a Usergrid properties file called usergrid-deployment.properties. The properties in this file tell Usergrid how to communicate with Cassandra and ElasticSearch, and how to form URLs using the hostname you wish to use for Usegrid. There are many properties that you can set to configure Usergrid.

Once you have created your Usergrid properties file, place it in the Tomcat lib directory. On a Linux system, that directory is probably located at /path/to/tomcat7/lib/

The Default Usergrid Properties File

You should review the defaults in the above file. To get you started, let’s look at a minimal example properties file that you can edit and use as your own.

Please note that if you are installing Usergrid on the same machine as Cassandra Server, then set the following property to true

   #Tell Usergrid that Cassandra is not embedded.
   cassandra.embedded=true

Stack STEP #5: Deploy ROOT.war to Tomcat

The next step is to deploy the Usergrid Stack software to Tomcat. There are a variety of ways of doing this and the simplest is probably to place the Usergrid Stack ROOT.war file into the Tomcat webapps directory, then restart Tomcat.

Look for messages like this, which indicate that the ROOT.war file was deployed:

INFO: Starting service Catalina
Jan 29, 2016 1:00:32 PM org.apache.catalina.core.StandardEngine startInternal
INFO: Starting Servlet Engine: Apache Tomcat/7.0.59
Jan 29, 2016 1:00:32 PM org.apache.catalina.startup.HostConfig deployWAR
INFO: Deploying web application archive /usr/share/tomcat7/webapps/ROOT.war

Does it work?

you can use curl:

curl http://localhost:8080/status

If you get a JSON file of status data, then you’re ready to move to the next step. You should see a response that begins like this:

{
“timestamp” : 1454090178953,
“duration” : 10,
“status” : {
“started” : 1453957327516,
“uptime” : 132851437,
“version” : “201601240200-595955dff9ee4a706de9d97b86c5f0636fe24b43”,
“cassandraAvailable” : true,
“cassandraStatus” : “GREEN”,
“managementAppIndexStatus” : “GREEN”,
“queueDepth” : 0,
“org.apache.usergrid.count.AbstractBatcher” : {
“add_invocation” : {
“type” : “timer”,
“unit” : “microseconds”,
… etc. …

Initialize the Usergrid Database

Next, you must initialize the Usergrid database, index and query systems.

To do this you must issue a series of HTTP operations using the superuser credentials. You can only do this if Usergrid is configured to allow superused login via this property usergrid.sysadmin.login.allowed=true and if you used the above example properties file, it is allowed.

The three operation you must perform are expressed by the curl commands below and, of course, you will have ot change the password test to match the superuser password that you set in your Usergrid properties file.

curl -X PUT http://localhost:8080/system/database/setup -u superuser:test
curl -X PUT http://localhost:8080/system/database/bootstrap -u superuser:test
curl -X GET http://localhost:8080/system/superuser/setup -u superuser:test

When you issue each of those curl commands, you should see a success message like this:

{
“action” : “cassandra setup”,
“status” : “ok”,
“timestamp” : 1454100922067,
“duration” : 374
}

Now that you’ve gotten Usergrid up and running, you’re ready to deploy the Usergrid Portal.

Deploying the Usergrid Portal

The Usergrid Portal is an HTML5/JavaScript application, a bunch of static files that can be deployed to any web server, e.g. Apache HTTPD or Tomcat.

To deploy the Portal to a web server, you will un-tar the usergrid-portal.tar file into directory that serves as the root directory of your web pages.

Once you have done that there is one more step. You need to configure the portal so that it can find the Usergrid stack. You do that by editing the portal/config.js and changing this line:

Usergrid.overrideUrl = ’http://localhost:8080/‘;

To set the hostname that you will be using for your Usergrid installation.

I have deployed a sample instance and tested the same. You can find the system ready configurations in TechUtils repository

Java Code to Zip all folders in a particular folder.

A small utility code to create multiple zip files for all folders in the a particular folder.

for example

- c:/path/to/folder
    -> folder 1
    -> folder 2
    -> folder 3
    -> folder 4

Output:

- c:/path/to/folder
    -> folder 1
    -> folder 2
    -> folder 3
    -> folder 4
    -> folder 1.zip
    -> folder 2.zip
    -> folder 3.zip
    -> folder 4.zip

original source: https://goo.gl/sp0bqr

LDAP Connector

Below is a sample code to perform LDAP Queries. Just modify the configuration information and then provide any valid query to get the search results.

You can also modify the code to get custom business logic as required.

 

K random combinations of N elements in List in Java

Given a List of N Strings, generate and print all possible combinations of R elements in array and return X random combinations from the result. Following is the code for implementing it:

HackerRank: Repeated String

Problem

Lilah has a string, s, of lowercase English letters that she repeated infinitely many times.

Given an integer, n, find and print the number of letter a‘s in the first letters of Lilah’s infinite string.

Input Format

The first line contains a single string, s.
The second line contains an integer, n.

Constraints

  • 1<=|s|<=100
  • 1<=|n|<=10^12
  • For 25% of the test cases, n <= 10^6

Output Format

Print a single integer denoting the number of letter a’s in the first letters of the infinite string created by repeating infinitely many times.

Sample Input 0

aba
10

Sample Output 0

7

Explanation 0

The first n = 10 letters of the infinite string are abaabaabaa. Because there are 7 a‘s, we print on a new line.

Sample Input 1

a
1000000000000

Sample Output 1

1000000000000

Explanation 1

Because all of the first n=1000000000000 letters of the infinite string are a, we print 1000000000000 on a new line.

Solution

Design Pattern: Factory Pattern

Factory Pattern is one of the most used design patterns in Java. It is an Creational Pattern, providing one of the best ways to create an object. The pattern enables the code to choose which implementation to call at run time based on arguments provided to the Factory. Thus helping to create generic and maintainable code. The pattern also allows the developer the ease of adding new types of implementations without changing the old code.

In Factory pattern, we create object without exposing the creation logic to the client and refer to newly created object using a common interface.

Implementation

The demo code shown below demonstrates Pizza variations and based on the argument type passed to it, the factory will return the type of Pizza requested for.

For demo purpose, the code only shows for Cheese, Veg and Fresh Pan Pizza only.

factory-pattern

Pros and Cons:

Pro’s:

  • Allows you to hide implementation of an application seam (the core interfaces that make up your application)
  • Allows you to easily test the seam of an application (that is to mock/stub) certain parts of your application so you can build and test the other parts
  • Allows you to change the design of your application more readily, this is known as loose coupling

Con’s

  • Makes code more difficult to read as all of your code is behind an abstraction that may in turn hide abstractions.
  • Can be classed as an anti-pattern when it is incorrectly used, for example some people use it to wire up a whole application when using an IOC container, instead use Dependency Injection.

Apache Commons DbUtils Mini Wrapper

This is a very small DB Connector code in Java as a wrapper class to Apache DBUtils.

The Commons DbUtils library is a small set of classes designed to make working with JDBC easier. JDBC resource cleanup code is mundane, error prone work so these classes abstract out all of the cleanup tasks from your code leaving you with what you really wanted to do with JDBC in the first place: query and update data.

Some of the advantages of using DbUtils are:

  • No possibility for resource leaks. Correct JDBC coding isn’t difficult but it is time-consuming and tedious. This often leads to connection leaks that may be difficult to track down.
  • Cleaner, clearer persistence code. The amount of code needed to persist data in a database is drastically reduced. The remaining code clearly expresses your intention without being cluttered with resource cleanup.
  • Automatically populate Java Bean properties from Result Sets. You don’t need to manually copy column values into bean instances by calling setter methods. Each row of the Result Set can be represented by one fully populated bean instance.

DbUtils is designed to be:

  • Small – you should be able to understand the whole package in a short amount of time.
  • Transparent – DbUtils doesn’t do any magic behind the scenes. You give it a query, it executes it and cleans up for you.
  • Fast – You don’t need to create a million temporary objects to work with DbUtils.

DbUtils is not:

  • An Object/Relational bridge – there are plenty of good O/R tools already. DbUtils is for developers looking to use JDBC without all the mundane pieces.
  • A Data Access Object (DAO) framework – DbUtils can be used to build a DAO framework though.
  • An object oriented abstraction of general database objects like a Table, Column, or Primary Key.
  • A heavyweight framework of any kind – the goal here is to be a straightforward and easy to use JDBC helper library.

Wrapper:

HackerRank: Circular Array Rotation

Problem

John Watson performs an operation called a right circular rotation on an array of integers, [a(0),a(1).a(2)...a(n-2),a(n-1)]. After performing one right circular rotation operation, the array is transformed from

[a(0),a(1).a(2)...a(n-2),a(n-1)]

to

[a(n-1),a(0),a(1).a(2)...a(n-2)].

Watson performs this operation k times. To test Sherlock’s ability to identify the current element at a particular position in the rotated array, Watson asks q queries, where each query consists of a single integer, m, for which you must print the element at index in the rotated array (i.e., the value of a(m)).

Input Format

The first line contains space-separated integers, n, k, and q, respectively.
The second line contains space-separated integers, where each integer i describes array element a(i)(where 0 <= i <= n).
Each of the q subsequent lines contains a single integer denoting m.

Constraints

  • 0 <= i <= 10^5
  • 0 <= a(i) <= 10^5
  • 0 <= k <= 10^5
  • 0 <= q <= 500
  • 0 <= m <= N-1

Output Format

For each query, print the value of the element at index m of the rotated array on a new line.

Sample Input
3 2 3
1 2 3
0
1
2
Sample Output
2
3
1

Explanation

After the first rotation, the array becomes [3,1,2].
After the second (and final) rotation, the array becomes [2,3,1].

Let’s refer to the array’s final state as array b. For each query, we just have to print the value of b(m) on a new line:

  • m=0 , so we print 2 on a new line.
  • m=1 , so we print 3 on a new line.
  • m=2 , so we print 1 on a new line.

Soluton

HackerEarth: Battle Of Bots 6: Draughts

Problem:

Sample Game

Draughts is a two player board game which is played on a 8X8 grid of cells and is played on opposite sides of the game-board. Each player has an allocated color, Red ( First Player ) or White ( Second Player ) being conventional. Players take turns involving diagonal moves of uniform game pieces in the forward direction only and mandatory captures by jumping over opponent pieces.

Rules:

  • Player can only move diagonally to the adjacent cell and in forward direction, if the diagonally adjacent cell is vacant.
  • A player may not move an opponent’s piece.
  • If the diagonally adjacent cell contains an opponent’s piece, and the cell immediately beyond it is vacant, the opponent’s piece may be captured (and removed from the game) by jumping over it in the forward direction only.
  • If a player made a jump, then its mandatory to keep on jumping as long as the jump is possible.
  • Player cannot move to the diagonally adjacent cell once the player made a jump.

The game will end when any of the players don’t have any move left. At the end of the game the player with majority of pieces will win.

We will play it on an 8X8 grid. The top left of the grid is [0,0] and the bottom right is [7,7].

Input:
The input will be a 8X8 matrix consisting only of 0o2. Then another line will follow which will contain a number –  1 or 2 which is your player id. In the given matrix, top-left is [0,0] and bottom-right is [7,7]. The x-coordinate increases from left to right, and y-coordinate increases from top to bottom.

The cell marked 0 means it doesn’t contain any stones. The cell marked 1 means it contains first player’s stone which is Red in color. The cell marked 2 means it contains second player’s stone which is white in color.

Output:
In the first line print the coordinates of the cell separated by space, the piece he / she wants to move.
In second line print an integer N, number of steps or jumps the piece will make in one move.
In the next N lines print the coordinates of the cells in which the piece will make jump.
You must take care that you don’t print invalid coordinates. For example, [1,1] might be a valid coordinate in the game play if [1,1] in diagonal to the piece in which is going to jump, but [9,10] will never be. Also if you play an invalid move or your code exceeds the time/memory limit while determining the move, you lose the game.

Starting state
The starting state of the game is the state of the board before the game starts.

0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1
1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 2 0 2 0 2 0 2
2 0 2 0 2 0 2 0

First Input
This is the input give to the first player at the start of the game.

0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1
1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 2 0 2 0 2 0 2
2 0 2 0 2 0 2 0
1
SAMPLE INPUT
0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1
1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0
0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2
2 0 2 0 2 0 2 0
1
SAMPLE OUTPUT
2 5
2
4 3
6 1

Explanation

This is player 1’s turn, and the player will move the piece at [2,5] and will make two jumps. First jump will be at [4,3and second jump will be at [6,1]

After his/her move the state of game becomes:

0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1
1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 1 0 2 0 2 0 2
2 0 2 0 2 0 2 0

This state will be fed as input to program of player 2.

Other valid move for the first player is

2 5
1
3 6

But the following are invalid moves.
Case 1:

2 5
1
4 3

Because after making a jump its possible to jump again and its mandatory to jump as long as its possible to jump.

Case 2:

2 5
2
4 3
5 4

Because after making a jump its invalid to move to diagonally adjacent cell.

Here is the code of the Random Bot.

Time Limit:1.0 sec(s) for each input file.
Memory Limit:256 MB
Source Limit:1024 KB

Solution

This is the solution submitted by me