#HackerEarth: #BattleOfBots 9: Taunt

Problem

Taunt is a two player board game which is played on a 10X4 grid of cells and is played on opposite sides of the game-board. Each player has an allocated color, Orange ( First Player ) or Green ( Second Player ) being conventional. Each player has nine piece in total. The players move their pieces towards to his / her opponent’s area by moving their pieces strategically. Each piece has a different moving feature and is one of the 3 types of pieces.

Piece 1: It can move to horizontally or vertically adjacent cell, if the cell doesn’t contain a piece of same color.

enter image description here

Piece 2: It can move to horizontally adjacent cell or can move two steps forward, if the cell doesn’t contain a piece of same color (except the piece itself).

enter image description here

This type of piece can move to its own position if its in the second last row of the grid and going downward or if its in the second row of the grid and going upward.

enter image description here

Piece 3: It can move two step diagonally in the forward direction, if the cell doesn’t contain a piece of same color (except the piece itself).

enter image description here enter image description here

This type of piece can move to its own position if its in the second last row of the grid and going downward or if its in the second row of the grid and going upward.

enter image description here

Players take turns involving moves of pieces as mentioned above and can captures opponent’s piece by jumping on or over opponent’s pieces.

Note: Forward direction for first player is downward and for second player is upward.

If a piece (except piece 1) is moving downward and touches the last row, its direction will change i.e. now it will move upward. Similarly, once if a piece (except piece 1) is moving upward and touches the first row, its direction will change i.e. now it will move downward.

Rules:

  • Player can only move according to the moves mentioned above.
  • A player may not move an opponent’s piece.
  • A player can captures opponent’s piece by jumping on or over opponent pieces.

The game will end after 100 moves ( 50 moves for each player ) or when any of the players don’t have any move left. At the end of the game the player with majority of pieces will win.

We will play it on an 10X4 grid. The top left of the grid is [0,0] and the bottom right is [9,3].

Input:
The input will be a 10X4 matrix consisting only of 0,1or2. Next line will contain an integer denoting the total number of moves till the current state of the board. Next line contains an integer – 1 or 2 which is your player id.

In the given matrix, top-left is [0,0] and bottom-right is [9,3]. The y-coordinate increases from left to right, and x-coordinate increases from top to bottom.

A cell is represented by 3 integers.

First integer denotes the player id (1 or 2).
Second integer denotes the type of piece (1, 2 or 3).
Third integer denotes the direction of the piece (0 (upward) or 1 (downward)). When the piece is of first type, direction doesn’t matter as the piece is free to move to horizontally or vertically adjacent cell, if the cell doesn’t contain a piece of same color.

Empty cell is represented by 000.

Output:
In the first line print the coordinates of the cell separated by space, the piece you want to move.
In second line print the coordinates of the cell in which the piece will jump.
You must take care that you don’t print invalid coordinates. For example, [1,1] might be a valid coordinate in the game play if the piece is able to jump to [1,1], but [9,10] will never be. Also if you play an invalid move or your code exceeds the time/memory limit while determining the move, you lose the game.

Starting state
The starting state of the game is the state of the board before the game starts.

131 131 131 121
121 121 111 111
111 000 000 000
000 000 000 000
000 000 000 000
000 000 000 000
000 000 000 000
000 000 000 210
210 210 220 220
220 230 230 230

First Input
This is the input give to the first player at the start of the game.

131 131 131 121
121 121 111 111
111 000 000 000
000 000 000 000
000 000 000 000
000 000 000 000
000 000 000 000
000 000 000 210
210 210 220 220
220 230 230 230
0
1

 

SAMPLE INPUT
000 000 000 000
000 000 000 111
000 000 111 130
000 000 000 000
000 000 000 000
000 220 000 000
131 000 000 000
121 000 210 000
000 210 131 000
000 210 000 000
58
1
SAMPLE OUTPUT
8 2
8 0

Explanation

This is player 1’s turn, and the player will move the piece at [8,2] and will take two steps diagonally in downward direction and will be at [8,0]
After his/her move the state of game becomes:

000 000 000 000
000 000 000 111
000 000 111 130
000 000 000 000
000 000 000 000
000 220 000 000
131 000 000 000
121 000 210 000
130 210 000 000
000 000 000 000
59
2

Note: Direction of the piece is also changed from 1 to 0 as the piece was moving downward and touches the last row. This state will be fed as input to program of player 2.

Here is the code of the default bot.

Time Limit:1.0 sec(s) for each input file.
Memory Limit:256 MB
Source Limit:1024 KB

Sample Game

Apache Commons DbUtils Mini Wrapper

This is a very small DB Connector code in Java as a wrapper class to Apache DBUtils.

The Commons DbUtils library is a small set of classes designed to make working with JDBC easier. JDBC resource cleanup code is mundane, error prone work so these classes abstract out all of the cleanup tasks from your code leaving you with what you really wanted to do with JDBC in the first place: query and update data.

Some of the advantages of using DbUtils are:

  • No possibility for resource leaks. Correct JDBC coding isn’t difficult but it is time-consuming and tedious. This often leads to connection leaks that may be difficult to track down.
  • Cleaner, clearer persistence code. The amount of code needed to persist data in a database is drastically reduced. The remaining code clearly expresses your intention without being cluttered with resource cleanup.
  • Automatically populate Java Bean properties from Result Sets. You don’t need to manually copy column values into bean instances by calling setter methods. Each row of the Result Set can be represented by one fully populated bean instance.

DbUtils is designed to be:

  • Small – you should be able to understand the whole package in a short amount of time.
  • Transparent – DbUtils doesn’t do any magic behind the scenes. You give it a query, it executes it and cleans up for you.
  • Fast – You don’t need to create a million temporary objects to work with DbUtils.

DbUtils is not:

  • An Object/Relational bridge – there are plenty of good O/R tools already. DbUtils is for developers looking to use JDBC without all the mundane pieces.
  • A Data Access Object (DAO) framework – DbUtils can be used to build a DAO framework though.
  • An object oriented abstraction of general database objects like a Table, Column, or Primary Key.
  • A heavyweight framework of any kind – the goal here is to be a straightforward and easy to use JDBC helper library.

Wrapper:

HackerRank: Circular Array Rotation

Problem

John Watson performs an operation called a right circular rotation on an array of integers, [a(0),a(1).a(2)...a(n-2),a(n-1)]. After performing one right circular rotation operation, the array is transformed from

[a(0),a(1).a(2)...a(n-2),a(n-1)]

to

[a(n-1),a(0),a(1).a(2)...a(n-2)].

Watson performs this operation k times. To test Sherlock’s ability to identify the current element at a particular position in the rotated array, Watson asks q queries, where each query consists of a single integer, m, for which you must print the element at index in the rotated array (i.e., the value of a(m)).

Input Format

The first line contains space-separated integers, n, k, and q, respectively.
The second line contains space-separated integers, where each integer i describes array element a(i)(where 0 <= i <= n).
Each of the q subsequent lines contains a single integer denoting m.

Constraints

  • 0 <= i <= 10^5
  • 0 <= a(i) <= 10^5
  • 0 <= k <= 10^5
  • 0 <= q <= 500
  • 0 <= m <= N-1

Output Format

For each query, print the value of the element at index m of the rotated array on a new line.

Sample Input
3 2 3
1 2 3
0
1
2
Sample Output
2
3
1

Explanation

After the first rotation, the array becomes [3,1,2].
After the second (and final) rotation, the array becomes [2,3,1].

Let’s refer to the array’s final state as array b. For each query, we just have to print the value of b(m) on a new line:

  • m=0 , so we print 2 on a new line.
  • m=1 , so we print 3 on a new line.
  • m=2 , so we print 1 on a new line.

Soluton

Common Mistakes in Collections

Source : http://javabeanz.wordpress.com/2007/07/13/treemap-vs-hashmap/

Classes like Integer, String, Double etc implements Comparable interface. So if we are to use an object of a custom class as the key, ensure that it’ s class implements the Comparable interface.

public class MyCustomKey implements Comparable
{
    private int value;
    public MyCustomKey(int value)
    {
       this.value = value;
    }           

    public int compareTo (MyCustomKey key)
    {
       int comparison = 0;           

       // Note:
       // Return -1 if this.value < key.value
       // Return  0 if this.value = key.value
       // Return  1 if this.value > key.value           

       return (comparison);
    }
}

A common mistake that everyone does is not to override the hashcode(). If we are failing to do so, map.get(new MyCustomKey()); may not give you what you were expecting. So it is always advised to override the hashCode() if objects of that class is being used as a key.

public class MyCustomKey implements Comparable
{
    private int value;
    public MyCustomKey(int value)
    {}
    public int compareTo (MyCustomKey key)
    {}        

    public int hashCode()
    {
        // Note:
        // If two objects are equal then their corresponding hashCode ()
        // should return the same value too.
        return (this.value * 199);
    }
}

When you are using your custom object as a key to a HashMap, make sure you do the following

1) implement Comparable
2) override compareTo method, and give its implementation
3) override hashCode and equals method, and give their implementation.
4) Always, make your key object as immutable, so that it is not changed after you add it to a HashMap as key.