#StackBounty: #sql-server #sql-server-2012 #ssrs SSRS and Managed Service Account – impossible to configure?

Bounty: 150

We are trying to configure Reporting Services to use a Managed Service Account. The environment is:

Server: Windows 2008 R2 SP1
Reporting Services: SQL Server 2012 (version 11.0.6567.0)

Currently, SSRS runs as a domain service account, but we would like to change to running as an MSA. The SQL Server instance and agent have both been successfully changed to use an MSA.

When I try to change the service account to an MSA, via Reporting Services Configuration Manager, I receive an error:

Microsoft.ReportingServices.WmiProvider.WMIProviderException: The account name is not valid. Specify an account in the form domainalias.

—> System.Runtime.InteropServices.COMException (0x8004021D): Exception from HRESULT: 0x8004021D
— End of inner exception stack trace —
at Microsoft.ReportingServices.WmiProvider.RSWmiAdmin.ThrowOnError(ManagementBaseObject mo)
at Microsoft.ReportingServices.WmiProvider.RSWmiAdmin.SetWindowsServiceIdentity(String accountName, SecureString password, Boolean useBuiltinAccount)
at ReportServicesConfigUI.WMIProvider.RSReportServerAdmin.SetWindowsServiceIdentity(String accountName, SecureString password, Boolean useBuiltinAccount)

My question is simple:

Has anyone successfully changed the SSRS service account to use a Managed Service Account? If so, how?!


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#StackBounty: #sql-server #sql-server-2012 #performance-tuning #multi-thread Identify threads with maximum difference in time

Bounty: 50

I have many parallel executing queries in my SQL Server database. I need to find out queries where the difference in time for the longest thread and the shortest thread is high (excluding co-ordinator thread). In fact, I need to find top 10 such queries with highest difference (from the queries that are getting exeuted in the span of 1 hour). How to track this information in SQL Server?

Note: I am using SQL Server 2012.

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#StackBounty: #sql-server-2012 #c# #powershell #smo Why can't C# SMO see extended properties on a column but Powershell SMO can?

Bounty: 200

I am attempting to read extended properties on tables and columns in a winforms C# application. I am using SQL Server SMO to do so. When I execute the application it does not see the extended properties, but when I read the extended properties using PowerShell, it does see the extended properties.

The C# code:

var x = col.ExtendedProperties.Count;
var NPI = col.ExtendedProperties["NPI"].Value;
bool npi = bool.Parse(NPI.ToString());

The PowerShell code:

Add-Type -AssemblyName "Microsoft.SqlServer.Smo, Version=11.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=89845dcd8080cc91"
$server = New-Object Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Smo.Server $env:COMPUTERNAME
$server.Databases["<db name>"].Tables["<table name>"].Columns["<column name>"].ExtendedProperties | Select Name, Value, State

I have checked and both Visual Studio and PowerShell are using the same version of SMO (11.0.0.0). When I execute the C# code the col.ExtendedProperties.Count = 0, but when I execute the PowerShell code I get:

Name Value    State
---- -----    -----
NPI  False Existing

Does anyone have any ideas as to why this could be happening?


Get this bounty!!!

#StackBounty: #sql-server-2012 #c# #powershell #smo Why can't C# SMO see extended properties on a column but Powershell SMO can?

Bounty: 200

I am attempting to read extended properties on tables and columns in a winforms C# application. I am using SQL Server SMO to do so. When I execute the application it does not see the extended properties, but when I read the extended properties using PowerShell, it does see the extended properties.

The C# code:

var x = col.ExtendedProperties.Count;
var NPI = col.ExtendedProperties["NPI"].Value;
bool npi = bool.Parse(NPI.ToString());

The PowerShell code:

Add-Type -AssemblyName "Microsoft.SqlServer.Smo, Version=11.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=89845dcd8080cc91"
$server = New-Object Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Smo.Server $env:COMPUTERNAME
$server.Databases["<db name>"].Tables["<table name>"].Columns["<column name>"].ExtendedProperties | Select Name, Value, State

I have checked and both Visual Studio and PowerShell are using the same version of SMO (11.0.0.0). When I execute the C# code the col.ExtendedProperties.Count = 0, but when I execute the PowerShell code I get:

Name Value    State
---- -----    -----
NPI  False Existing

Does anyone have any ideas as to why this could be happening?


Get this bounty!!!

#StackBounty: #sql-server-2012 #c# #powershell #smo Why can't C# SMO see extended properties on a column but Powershell SMO can?

Bounty: 200

I am attempting to read extended properties on tables and columns in a winforms C# application. I am using SQL Server SMO to do so. When I execute the application it does not see the extended properties, but when I read the extended properties using PowerShell, it does see the extended properties.

The C# code:

var x = col.ExtendedProperties.Count;
var NPI = col.ExtendedProperties["NPI"].Value;
bool npi = bool.Parse(NPI.ToString());

The PowerShell code:

Add-Type -AssemblyName "Microsoft.SqlServer.Smo, Version=11.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=89845dcd8080cc91"
$server = New-Object Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Smo.Server $env:COMPUTERNAME
$server.Databases["<db name>"].Tables["<table name>"].Columns["<column name>"].ExtendedProperties | Select Name, Value, State

I have checked and both Visual Studio and PowerShell are using the same version of SMO (11.0.0.0). When I execute the C# code the col.ExtendedProperties.Count = 0, but when I execute the PowerShell code I get:

Name Value    State
---- -----    -----
NPI  False Existing

Does anyone have any ideas as to why this could be happening?


Get this bounty!!!

#StackBounty: #sql-server-2012 #c# #powershell #smo Why can't C# SMO see extended properties on a column but Powershell SMO can?

Bounty: 200

I am attempting to read extended properties on tables and columns in a winforms C# application. I am using SQL Server SMO to do so. When I execute the application it does not see the extended properties, but when I read the extended properties using PowerShell, it does see the extended properties.

The C# code:

var x = col.ExtendedProperties.Count;
var NPI = col.ExtendedProperties["NPI"].Value;
bool npi = bool.Parse(NPI.ToString());

The PowerShell code:

Add-Type -AssemblyName "Microsoft.SqlServer.Smo, Version=11.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=89845dcd8080cc91"
$server = New-Object Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Smo.Server $env:COMPUTERNAME
$server.Databases["<db name>"].Tables["<table name>"].Columns["<column name>"].ExtendedProperties | Select Name, Value, State

I have checked and both Visual Studio and PowerShell are using the same version of SMO (11.0.0.0). When I execute the C# code the col.ExtendedProperties.Count = 0, but when I execute the PowerShell code I get:

Name Value    State
---- -----    -----
NPI  False Existing

Does anyone have any ideas as to why this could be happening?


Get this bounty!!!

#StackBounty: #sql-server-2012 #c# #powershell #smo Why can't C# SMO see extended properties on a column but Powershell SMO can?

Bounty: 200

I am attempting to read extended properties on tables and columns in a winforms C# application. I am using SQL Server SMO to do so. When I execute the application it does not see the extended properties, but when I read the extended properties using PowerShell, it does see the extended properties.

The C# code:

var x = col.ExtendedProperties.Count;
var NPI = col.ExtendedProperties["NPI"].Value;
bool npi = bool.Parse(NPI.ToString());

The PowerShell code:

Add-Type -AssemblyName "Microsoft.SqlServer.Smo, Version=11.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=89845dcd8080cc91"
$server = New-Object Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Smo.Server $env:COMPUTERNAME
$server.Databases["<db name>"].Tables["<table name>"].Columns["<column name>"].ExtendedProperties | Select Name, Value, State

I have checked and both Visual Studio and PowerShell are using the same version of SMO (11.0.0.0). When I execute the C# code the col.ExtendedProperties.Count = 0, but when I execute the PowerShell code I get:

Name Value    State
---- -----    -----
NPI  False Existing

Does anyone have any ideas as to why this could be happening?


Get this bounty!!!

#StackBounty: #sql-server-2012 #c# #powershell #smo Why can't C# SMO see extended properties on a column but Powershell SMO can?

Bounty: 200

I am attempting to read extended properties on tables and columns in a winforms C# application. I am using SQL Server SMO to do so. When I execute the application it does not see the extended properties, but when I read the extended properties using PowerShell, it does see the extended properties.

The C# code:

var x = col.ExtendedProperties.Count;
var NPI = col.ExtendedProperties["NPI"].Value;
bool npi = bool.Parse(NPI.ToString());

The PowerShell code:

Add-Type -AssemblyName "Microsoft.SqlServer.Smo, Version=11.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=89845dcd8080cc91"
$server = New-Object Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Smo.Server $env:COMPUTERNAME
$server.Databases["<db name>"].Tables["<table name>"].Columns["<column name>"].ExtendedProperties | Select Name, Value, State

I have checked and both Visual Studio and PowerShell are using the same version of SMO (11.0.0.0). When I execute the C# code the col.ExtendedProperties.Count = 0, but when I execute the PowerShell code I get:

Name Value    State
---- -----    -----
NPI  False Existing

Does anyone have any ideas as to why this could be happening?


Get this bounty!!!

#StackBounty: #sql-server-2012 #c# #powershell #smo Why can't C# SMO see extended properties on a column but Powershell SMO can?

Bounty: 200

I am attempting to read extended properties on tables and columns in a winforms C# application. I am using SQL Server SMO to do so. When I execute the application it does not see the extended properties, but when I read the extended properties using PowerShell, it does see the extended properties.

The C# code:

var x = col.ExtendedProperties.Count;
var NPI = col.ExtendedProperties["NPI"].Value;
bool npi = bool.Parse(NPI.ToString());

The PowerShell code:

Add-Type -AssemblyName "Microsoft.SqlServer.Smo, Version=11.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=89845dcd8080cc91"
$server = New-Object Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Smo.Server $env:COMPUTERNAME
$server.Databases["<db name>"].Tables["<table name>"].Columns["<column name>"].ExtendedProperties | Select Name, Value, State

I have checked and both Visual Studio and PowerShell are using the same version of SMO (11.0.0.0). When I execute the C# code the col.ExtendedProperties.Count = 0, but when I execute the PowerShell code I get:

Name Value    State
---- -----    -----
NPI  False Existing

Does anyone have any ideas as to why this could be happening?


Get this bounty!!!

#StackBounty: #sql-server-2012 #c# #powershell #smo Why can't C# SMO see extended properties on a column but Powershell SMO can?

Bounty: 200

I am attempting to read extended properties on tables and columns in a winforms C# application. I am using SQL Server SMO to do so. When I execute the application it does not see the extended properties, but when I read the extended properties using PowerShell, it does see the extended properties.

The C# code:

var x = col.ExtendedProperties.Count;
var NPI = col.ExtendedProperties["NPI"].Value;
bool npi = bool.Parse(NPI.ToString());

The PowerShell code:

Add-Type -AssemblyName "Microsoft.SqlServer.Smo, Version=11.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=89845dcd8080cc91"
$server = New-Object Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Smo.Server $env:COMPUTERNAME
$server.Databases["<db name>"].Tables["<table name>"].Columns["<column name>"].ExtendedProperties | Select Name, Value, State

I have checked and both Visual Studio and PowerShell are using the same version of SMO (11.0.0.0). When I execute the C# code the col.ExtendedProperties.Count = 0, but when I execute the PowerShell code I get:

Name Value    State
---- -----    -----
NPI  False Existing

Does anyone have any ideas as to why this could be happening?


Get this bounty!!!