#StackBounty: #display #hardware-failure #external-display #displayport #capacitor Monitor never detects input, turns off within a few …

Bounty: 50

My monitor has caused me troubles before, whenever I unplug it and replug it, it could take ~1 hour to detect the input. In the past I ensured not to unplug it, so over nearly a year it didn’t cause me any trouble.

Then today I built a new PC and plugged my monitors into it, now one of them will not work. However I tested using my old PC, the issue is the 100% the monitor

Troubleshooting / info:

I tried a working HDMI cable into a working PC. I have 2 identical monitors, so I even tried the working power cable, still nothing.

If I select a source that has no input, ‘Check Signal Cable’ shows forever, which is expected and means it’s probably not a power issue

When the correct source is selected, The monitor goes black for about 3 seconds, before turning off. It never shows any input

All of the settings on the monitor are grayed out, except System/PC/AV Mode and System/Display Port Ver.. This means the input is not being detected. Testing using my working monitor, those options become available when a source is plugged in.

I’ve read online that this issue can be caused by bulging capacitors, however I took the monitor apart and I don’t see any capacitors at all (unless they are onboard capacitors?):

https://imgur.com/gallery/hX6mRiI


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#StackBounty: #debian #nvidia #displayport #xinerama Nvidia Xinerama 1xGT1030 to 2 DP monitors with either nouveau/nvidia driver

Bounty: 50

I have GeForce GT 1030 card with 2 Dell U2415 monitors. The connection is 1030’s DisplayPort => Monitor 1 DP Input; Monitor 1 DP Output => Monitor 2 DP Input.

The OS is Debian Buster (10), with the default nouveau driver.

I have tried all possible scenarios I can think of w/o any success. What’s in common is that when I boot the machine both screens are showing the BIOS/GRUB/OS booting. The action comes when Xorg comes.

  1. Nouveau driver, regular boot. The login screen is seen on the 2nd screen, after login I can see only xfce4 background and the mouse can leave to the left where the main (1st) screen should be, but it is black. Xorg.log
  2. Nouveau driver, nomodeset boot. Both monitors have blinking underscore with Xorg dead. Xorg.log
  3. Nvidia driver (from the Debian’s non-free repo). xfce4-display-settings shows the 2 monitors, but the 2nd one is marked as ‘Disabled’. If I enable the 2nd screen, the screen on the 1st one blinks and both are seen as active. The mouse can leave the 1st monitor to where the screen of the 2nd should be, but the 2nd is totally black. Selecting ‘mirror displays’ doesn’t help either – still black screen on the 2nd monitor. The ‘configure new displays when connected’ is checked. Tried to turn off the 2nd screen – it dissapears from both xfce4-display-settings and nvidia X server settings. Turning it on again asks me how to deal with the monitor. Selecting to extend to the right accepts my change, both monitors are seen as active on both xfce4-display-settings and nvidia X server settings. The position of the 2nd one is Absolute +1920+0 as it should be, but it is still black. Xorg.log
  4. Same Nvidia driver, with the xorg.conf provided by the Nvidia X server settings xfce4-display-settings pops up with Unable to start the XFCE display settings. Unable to query the version of the RandR extension being used. xrandr command returns RandR extension missing. Only first screen works, the 2nd one is black Xorg.log

The monitors are tested with the same cables from one Intel NUK using the same OS (Debian 10 Buster) but with the intel’s graphic card and the Xinerama works properly out of the box.

What I’m missing which can be done in order to feed the 2 monitors using the GT 1030?


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#StackBounty: #multiple-monitors #hdmi #displayport #thunderbolt Active/Passive Thunderbolt 3 to HDMI

Bounty: 150

I have a 2019 MacBook Pro 16" that has four thunderbolt 3 ports. Currently I have three cheap-o USB C to HDMI adapters that work well, but I feel like there is a drag on my system resources.

My question: is there an adapter that is preferred to allow the native Thunderbolt -> HDMI to pass through? I am fairly certain that those $20 dongles from Amazon are using the CPU in order to do the display output (are these considered active?).

According to the Thunderbolt website https://thunderbolttechnology.net/tech/faq, Thunderbolt natively supports Display Port. If I were to get a passive Thunderbolt 3 cable to Display Port, then get a DisplayPort to HDMI converter (my monitor doesn’t have Display Port) would this work without taxing the CPU?

Thanks in advance!


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#StackBounty: #boot #bios #hdmi #uefi #displayport Can't get into the BIOS/UEFI or see boot output on DisplayPort, but can on HDMI …

Bounty: 100

Per the title, this is the extent of my problem. When booting this system, there is no output on the screen (or even a signal – the monitor goes to sleep) until Windows comes up and shows me the login screen. Aside from this annoying BIOS/UEFI issue, the computer works normally.

If I connect a monitor via HDMI instead of DisplayPort, then I’m able to see the BIOS/UEFI as expected, boot messages, and so forth. However, due to my workstation setup (HDMI on my monitor is connected to another system), I want to stay on DisplayPort if at all possible

Further, apparently randomly, a 1 long, 3 short beep code is generated on cold boots, which indicates inability to detect the GPU. (This beep does not happen every cold boot, and happens roughly 60% of the time)

However, even on boots where this beep code happens, eventually Windows starts, displays the login screen, and the computer works otherwise normally.

This problem started when I upgraded from a GTX970 to a GTX1070. The 970 did not have this problem, the 1070 and 2080 did.

System Specs

  • ASUS Maximus IX Hero (BIOS version 1301, 3/14/2018)
  • I7-7700K @ 4.2GHz
  • 32 GB RAM
  • GeForce RTX 2080 SUPER (previously a GeForce 1070, and before that a 970)
  • Windows 10 Pro

What I have tried

  • Setting the Compatibility Support Module to Auto/Enabled/Disabled (source, fixed the problem for someone else)
  • Setting PEG as the primary display device in the UEFI/BIOS.
  • Installing Windows 10 in UEFI mode (by installing with the CSM set to enabled or auto)
  • Disconnecting all devices from the computer aside from the keyboard and display
  • An entirely new GPU (Twice!)
  • Another DisplayPort monitor
  • Another DisplayPort cable
  • Modifying the deep sleep, OD, and refresh rate overclock on the monitor.
  • Every combination of the above three items
  • Upgrading the GPU firmware on the 1070 (source, references “blank screens on boot until the OS loads”)

How do I get the BIOS/UEFI output to show up on my one and only monitor?


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#StackBounty: #boot #bios #hdmi #uefi #displayport Can't get into the BIOS/UEFI or see boot output on DisplayPort, but can on HDMI …

Bounty: 100

Per the title, this is the extent of my problem. When booting this system, there is no output on the screen (or even a signal – the monitor goes to sleep) until Windows comes up and shows me the login screen. Aside from this annoying BIOS/UEFI issue, the computer works normally.

If I connect a monitor via HDMI instead of DisplayPort, then I’m able to see the BIOS/UEFI as expected, boot messages, and so forth. However, due to my workstation setup (HDMI on my monitor is connected to another system), I want to stay on DisplayPort if at all possible

Further, apparently randomly, a 1 long, 3 short beep code is generated on cold boots, which indicates inability to detect the GPU. (This beep does not happen every cold boot, and happens roughly 60% of the time)

However, even on boots where this beep code happens, eventually Windows starts, displays the login screen, and the computer works otherwise normally.

This problem started when I upgraded from a GTX970 to a GTX1070. The 970 did not have this problem, the 1070 and 2080 did.

System Specs

  • ASUS Maximus IX Hero (BIOS version 1301, 3/14/2018)
  • I7-7700K @ 4.2GHz
  • 32 GB RAM
  • GeForce RTX 2080 SUPER (previously a GeForce 1070, and before that a 970)
  • Windows 10 Pro

What I have tried

  • Setting the Compatibility Support Module to Auto/Enabled/Disabled (source, fixed the problem for someone else)
  • Setting PEG as the primary display device in the UEFI/BIOS.
  • Installing Windows 10 in UEFI mode (by installing with the CSM set to enabled or auto)
  • Disconnecting all devices from the computer aside from the keyboard and display
  • An entirely new GPU (Twice!)
  • Another DisplayPort monitor
  • Another DisplayPort cable
  • Modifying the deep sleep, OD, and refresh rate overclock on the monitor.
  • Every combination of the above three items
  • Upgrading the GPU firmware on the 1070 (source, references “blank screens on boot until the OS loads”)

How do I get the BIOS/UEFI output to show up on my one and only monitor?


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#StackBounty: #multiple-monitors #displayport #usb-c #daisychaining DisplayPort over USB-C resolutions

Bounty: 50

I have the following equipment:

I’d like to be able to connect the laptop to the Dell monitor with a single USB-C cable, and then connect the Dell monitor to the HP monitor with a single DisplayPort cable. This should also charge the laptop. When I do this, though, Windows won’t let me set the HP monitor to its full resolution (it just doesn’t show anything higher than 1920×1080 in the list). For now all I can do is connect each monitor to the laptop with a separate USB-C cable, which does work, but I would prefer to only connect one cable to the laptop (for convenience). Is there any way?


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#StackBounty: #displayport #thunderbolt What's the compatibility story for DisplayPort 1.4 and Thunderbolt 3.0?

Bounty: 200

Intel Titan Ridge controllers (and if I gather correctly, Ice Lake CPUs) are DisplayPort 1.4 and TB3 compatible (Intel Ark).

I understand very well how this works in DisplayPort Alternate Mode: the host is told to switch into this alternate mode and from that point on, the cable is basically a DisplayPort cable with a different connector. If we have a laptop with a DisplayPort 1.4 capable GPU and Titan Ridge and a 3440×1440 @ 144 Hz monitor (which requires more DP bandwidth than DP 1.2 has) I would expect every USB C dock / adapter with a DisplayPort output to just work because all the dock needs to do is blindly connect the lanes in the USB C connection carrying DisplayPort signals to the DisplayPort outputs.

I can’t wrap my head around the Thunderbolt story, however. What’s the compatibility expectation here? Let’s take an Alpine Ridge based dock which is the majority of the market currently. Do we expect the monitor to work at full resolution and frequency if plugged into a DisplayPort port on the dock? If monitor has a USB C input but not Thunderbolt input, would plugging that into the downstream port of the dock work? My understanding is the TB3 standard requires the downstream ports to work in DP alt mode (this answer corroborates) but I do not know about the DP version here. How much does the TB3 controller dock “interpret” and how much does it slavishly copy?


Get this bounty!!!

#StackBounty: #displayport #thunderbolt What's the compatibility story for DisplayPort 1.4 and Thunderbolt 3.0?

Bounty: 200

Intel Titan Ridge controllers (and if I gather correctly, Ice Lake CPUs) are DisplayPort 1.4 and TB3 compatible (Intel Ark).

I understand very well how this works in DisplayPort Alternate Mode: the host is told to switch into this alternate mode and from that point on, the cable is basically a DisplayPort cable with a different connector. If we have a laptop with a DisplayPort 1.4 capable GPU and Titan Ridge and a 3440×1440 @ 144 Hz monitor (which requires more DP bandwidth than DP 1.2 has) I would expect every USB C dock / adapter with a DisplayPort output to just work because all the dock needs to do is blindly connect the lanes in the USB C connection carrying DisplayPort signals to the DisplayPort outputs.

I can’t wrap my head around the Thunderbolt story, however. What’s the compatibility expectation here? Let’s take an Alpine Ridge based dock which is the majority of the market currently. Do we expect the monitor to work at full resolution and frequency if plugged into a DisplayPort port on the dock? If monitor has a USB C input but not Thunderbolt input, would plugging that into the downstream port of the dock work? My understanding is the TB3 standard requires the downstream ports to work in DP alt mode (this answer corroborates) but I do not know about the DP version here. How much does the TB3 controller dock “interpret” and how much does it slavishly copy?


Get this bounty!!!

#StackBounty: #displayport #thunderbolt What's the compatibility story for DisplayPort 1.4 and Thunderbolt 3.0?

Bounty: 200

Intel Titan Ridge controllers (and if I gather correctly, Ice Lake CPUs) are DisplayPort 1.4 and TB3 compatible (Intel Ark).

I understand very well how this works in DisplayPort Alternate Mode: the host is told to switch into this alternate mode and from that point on, the cable is basically a DisplayPort cable with a different connector. If we have a laptop with a DisplayPort 1.4 capable GPU and Titan Ridge and a 3440×1440 @ 144 Hz monitor (which requires more DP bandwidth than DP 1.2 has) I would expect every USB C dock / adapter with a DisplayPort output to just work because all the dock needs to do is blindly connect the lanes in the USB C connection carrying DisplayPort signals to the DisplayPort outputs.

I can’t wrap my head around the Thunderbolt story, however. What’s the compatibility expectation here? Let’s take an Alpine Ridge based dock which is the majority of the market currently. Do we expect the monitor to work at full resolution and frequency if plugged into a DisplayPort port on the dock? If monitor has a USB C input but not Thunderbolt input, would plugging that into the downstream port of the dock work? My understanding is the TB3 standard requires the downstream ports to work in DP alt mode (this answer corroborates) but I do not know about the DP version here. How much does the TB3 controller dock “interpret” and how much does it slavishly copy?


Get this bounty!!!

#StackBounty: #displayport #thunderbolt What's the compatibility story for DisplayPort 1.4 and Thunderbolt 3.0?

Bounty: 200

Intel Titan Ridge controllers (and if I gather correctly, Ice Lake CPUs) are DisplayPort 1.4 and TB3 compatible (Intel Ark).

I understand very well how this works in DisplayPort Alternate Mode: the host is told to switch into this alternate mode and from that point on, the cable is basically a DisplayPort cable with a different connector. If we have a laptop with a DisplayPort 1.4 capable GPU and Titan Ridge and a 3440×1440 @ 144 Hz monitor (which requires more DP bandwidth than DP 1.2 has) I would expect every USB C dock / adapter with a DisplayPort output to just work because all the dock needs to do is blindly connect the lanes in the USB C connection carrying DisplayPort signals to the DisplayPort outputs.

I can’t wrap my head around the Thunderbolt story, however. What’s the compatibility expectation here? Let’s take an Alpine Ridge based dock which is the majority of the market currently. Do we expect the monitor to work at full resolution and frequency if plugged into a DisplayPort port on the dock? If monitor has a USB C input but not Thunderbolt input, would plugging that into the downstream port of the dock work? My understanding is the TB3 standard requires the downstream ports to work in DP alt mode (this answer corroborates) but I do not know about the DP version here. How much does the TB3 controller dock “interpret” and how much does it slavishly copy?


Get this bounty!!!