#StackBounty: #arch-linux #linux-kernel #drivers #sd-card mmc0: error -110 whilst initialising SD card

Bounty: 50

I have an issue with my Arch.I insert the SD I can’t detect it.

Also I find the following error kernel log:

  uname -a 
    Linux localhost.localdomain 4.9.6-1-ARCH #1 SMP PREEMPT Thu Jan 26 09:22:26 CET 2017 x86_64 GNU/Linux

    dmesg
    [    3.663535] mmc0: error -110 whilst initialising SD card
    [    4.515911] random: fast init done
    [    4.720224] mmc0: error -110 whilst initialising SD card

lspci -v 
00:00.0 Host bridge: Intel Corporation Skylake Host Bridge/DRAM Registers (rev 08)
    Subsystem: Lenovo Device 5048
    Flags: bus master, fast devsel, latency 0
    Capabilities: <access denied>
    Kernel driver in use: skl_uncore

00:02.0 VGA compatible controller: Intel Corporation HD Graphics 520 (rev 07) (prog-if 00 [VGA controller])
    Subsystem: Lenovo Device 5048
    Flags: bus master, fast devsel, latency 0, IRQ 128
    Memory at f0000000 (64-bit, non-prefetchable) [size=16M]
    Memory at e0000000 (64-bit, prefetchable) [size=256M]
    I/O ports at 3000 [size=64]
    [virtual] Expansion ROM at 000c0000 [disabled] [size=128K]
    Capabilities: <access denied>
    Kernel driver in use: i915
    Kernel modules: i915

00:14.0 USB controller: Intel Corporation Sunrise Point-LP USB 3.0 xHCI Controller (rev 21) (prog-if 30 [XHCI])
    Subsystem: Lenovo Device 5048
    Flags: bus master, medium devsel, latency 0, IRQ 123
    Memory at f1220000 (64-bit, non-prefetchable) [size=64K]
    Capabilities: <access denied>
    Kernel driver in use: xhci_hcd
    Kernel modules: xhci_pci

00:14.2 Signal processing controller: Intel Corporation Sunrise Point-LP Thermal subsystem (rev 21)
    Subsystem: Lenovo Device 5048
    Flags: bus master, fast devsel, latency 0, IRQ 18
    Memory at f124a000 (64-bit, non-prefetchable) [size=4K]
    Capabilities: <access denied>
    Kernel driver in use: intel_pch_thermal
    Kernel modules: intel_pch_thermal

00:16.0 Communication controller: Intel Corporation Sunrise Point-LP CSME HECI #1 (rev 21)
    Subsystem: Lenovo Device 5048
    Flags: bus master, fast devsel, latency 0, IRQ 127
    Memory at f124b000 (64-bit, non-prefetchable) [size=4K]
    Capabilities: <access denied>
    Kernel driver in use: mei_me
    Kernel modules: mei_me

00:17.0 SATA controller: Intel Corporation Sunrise Point-LP SATA Controller [AHCI mode] (rev 21) (prog-if 01 [AHCI 1.0])
    Subsystem: Lenovo Device 5048
    Flags: bus master, 66MHz, medium devsel, latency 0, IRQ 124
    Memory at f1248000 (32-bit, non-prefetchable) [size=8K]
    Memory at f124e000 (32-bit, non-prefetchable) [size=256]
    I/O ports at 3080 [size=8]
    I/O ports at 3088 [size=4]
    I/O ports at 3060 [size=32]
    Memory at f124c000 (32-bit, non-prefetchable) [size=2K]
    Capabilities: <access denied>
    Kernel driver in use: ahci
    Kernel modules: ahci

00:1c.0 PCI bridge: Intel Corporation Device 9d12 (rev f1) (prog-if 00 [Normal decode])
    Flags: bus master, fast devsel, latency 0, IRQ 18
    Bus: primary=00, secondary=01, subordinate=01, sec-latency=0
    Memory behind bridge: f1100000-f11fffff
    Capabilities: <access denied>
    Kernel driver in use: pcieport
    Kernel modules: shpchp

00:1c.5 PCI bridge: Intel Corporation Sunrise Point-LP PCI Express Root Port #6 (rev f1) (prog-if 00 [Normal decode])
    Flags: bus master, fast devsel, latency 0, IRQ 17
    Bus: primary=00, secondary=02, subordinate=02, sec-latency=0
    Memory behind bridge: f1000000-f10fffff
    Capabilities: <access denied>
    Kernel driver in use: pcieport
    Kernel modules: shpchp

00:1f.0 ISA bridge: Intel Corporation Sunrise Point-LP LPC Controller (rev 21)
    Subsystem: Lenovo Device 5048
    Flags: bus master, medium devsel, latency 0

00:1f.2 Memory controller: Intel Corporation Sunrise Point-LP PMC (rev 21)
    Subsystem: Lenovo Device 5048
    Flags: bus master, fast devsel, latency 0
    Memory at f1244000 (32-bit, non-prefetchable) [size=16K]
    Kernel driver in use: intel_pmc_core

00:1f.3 Audio device: Intel Corporation Sunrise Point-LP HD Audio (rev 21)
    Subsystem: Lenovo Device 5048
    Flags: bus master, fast devsel, latency 64, IRQ 129
    Memory at f1240000 (64-bit, non-prefetchable) [size=16K]
    Memory at f1230000 (64-bit, non-prefetchable) [size=64K]
    Capabilities: <access denied>
    Kernel driver in use: snd_hda_intel
    Kernel modules: snd_hda_intel, snd_soc_skl

00:1f.4 SMBus: Intel Corporation Sunrise Point-LP SMBus (rev 21)
    Subsystem: Lenovo Device 5048
    Flags: medium devsel, IRQ 16
    Memory at f124d000 (64-bit, non-prefetchable) [size=256]
    I/O ports at efa0 [size=32]
    Kernel driver in use: i801_smbus
    Kernel modules: i2c_i801

00:1f.6 Ethernet controller: Intel Corporation Ethernet Connection I219-V (rev 21)
    Subsystem: Lenovo Device 5048
    Flags: bus master, fast devsel, latency 0, IRQ 125
    Memory at f1200000 (32-bit, non-prefetchable) [size=128K]
    Capabilities: <access denied>
    Kernel driver in use: e1000e
    Kernel modules: e1000e

01:00.0 Network controller: Intel Corporation Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 3165 Plus Bluetooth (rev 99)
    Subsystem: Intel Corporation Device 4210
    Flags: bus master, fast devsel, latency 0, IRQ 126
    Memory at f1100000 (64-bit, non-prefetchable) [size=8K]
    Capabilities: <access denied>
    Kernel driver in use: iwlwifi
    Kernel modules: iwlwifi

02:00.0 Unassigned class [ff00]: Realtek Semiconductor Co., Ltd. RTS522A PCI Express Card Reader (rev 01)
    Subsystem: Lenovo Device 5048
    Flags: bus master, fast devsel, latency 0, IRQ 122
    Memory at f1000000 (32-bit, non-prefetchable) [size=4K]
    Capabilities: <access denied>
    Kernel driver in use: rtsx_pci
    Kernel modules: rtsx_pci

So I can fix this?


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#StackBounty: #linux-kernel #zswap Which process (kernel thread) is doing the actual compression for zswap?

Bounty: 100

I can imagine actually two locations:

  1. In the kernel space belonging to the process whose ram is being swapped in/out
  2. From [kswapd0]

However, digging into the kswapd source (mm/vmscan.c, init/main.c), I could find: kswapd is single-threaded, and is started on a single thread. (Except on NUMA systems, where all the memory regions have a different kswapd. But most ordinary PCs are not NUMA systems.)

However, from now we have a problem. We can estimate the disk is far slower than the memory, this is why we don’t need multi-threaded kswapd to handle the disk I/O. But not this is the case if we need to utilize also the internal zswap layer. Particularly from stronger compression rates (deflate), cpu can, and likely will be a bottleneck.

But kswapd is single-threaded.

Is it true?

Is being any multi-threaded kswapd planned? Is it really needed?


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#StackBounty: #kernel #linux-kernel #interrupt What's the policy determining which CPU handles which interrupt in the Linux Kernel?

Bounty: 50

I’ve been reading Linux Kernel Development and there’s something that’s not entirely clear to me — when an interrupt is triggered by the hardware, what’s the criterion to decide on which CPU to run the interrupt handling logic?

I could imagine it having to be always the same CPU that raised the IO request, but as the thread is for all purposes now sleeping there would not really be that much of a point in doing that.

On the other hand, there may be timing interrupts (for the scheduler, for instance) that need to be raised. On an SMP system are they always raised on the same core (let’s say, #0) or they’re always pretty much raised at any core?

How does it actually work?

Thanks


Get this bounty!!!

#StackBounty: #kernel #linux-kernel #interrupt What's the policy determining which CPU handles which interrupt in the Linux Kernel?

Bounty: 50

I’ve been reading Linux Kernel Development and there’s something that’s not entirely clear to me — when an interrupt is triggered by the hardware, what’s the criterion to decide on which CPU to run the interrupt handling logic?

I could imagine it having to be always the same CPU that raised the IO request, but as the thread is for all purposes now sleeping there would not really be that much of a point in doing that.

On the other hand, there may be timing interrupts (for the scheduler, for instance) that need to be raised. On an SMP system are they always raised on the same core (let’s say, #0) or they’re always pretty much raised at any core?

How does it actually work?

Thanks


Get this bounty!!!

#StackBounty: #kernel #linux-kernel #interrupt What's the policy determining which CPU handles which interrupt in the Linux Kernel?

Bounty: 50

I’ve been reading Linux Kernel Development and there’s something that’s not entirely clear to me — when an interrupt is triggered by the hardware, what’s the criterion to decide on which CPU to run the interrupt handling logic?

I could imagine it having to be always the same CPU that raised the IO request, but as the thread is for all purposes now sleeping there would not really be that much of a point in doing that.

On the other hand, there may be timing interrupts (for the scheduler, for instance) that need to be raised. On an SMP system are they always raised on the same core (let’s say, #0) or they’re always pretty much raised at any core?

How does it actually work?

Thanks


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#StackBounty: #networking #linux-kernel #security #netstat #namespace What network connections are not seen by netstat/lsof/ss?

Bounty: 50

Network monitoring tools ss, lsof -i, netstat -ltupw and similar have limitations like namespace and thus they don’t show the whole machine connections. (for namespace created with ip we can see other connections with ip -all netns exec ss).

The kernel state the connections here /proc/net/tcp[udp][raw] and namespace connections can be seen here /proc/$pid/net/tcp[udp][raw] (detail)

What are the other possible connections that are not seen by ss/lsof/netstat and how to monitor them?


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#StackBounty: #ubuntu #linux-kernel #compiling #arm How to upgrade kernel on Pinebook now ARM support is mainlined?

Bounty: 50

I have a Pinebook with a Quad-Core ARM Cortex A53 64-Bit CPU running the official KDE Neon image with the really old official 3.10 kernel. In 4.17 support for the Pinebook was mainlined, so technically I should be able to build the latest mainline kernel, package it as a deb and install it, right?

However, I can only find instructions on how to do that with x86 based machines. Where do I start if I want to do that on my ARM Pinebook?


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#StackBounty: #linux #linux-kernel #drivers #kernel-modules How to read DDR4 SPD with ee1004 driver?

Bounty: 50

I’m trying to read DDR4 RAM SPD data with the new ee1004 driver. I thought that after modprobe ee1004 I would be able to read data from /sys/bus/i2c/drivers/ee1004, however thats not the case (no devices appeared there). Am I missing something?

I’m running Ubuntu 19.04 with Kernel 5.0.0-13. Contents of ee1004 directory in sysfs is:

user@ryzen:/sys/bus/i2c/drivers/ee1004$ ls -l
celkom 0
--w------- 1 root root 4096 apr 28 21:33 bind
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root    0 apr 28 21:33 module -> ../../../../module/ee1004
--w------- 1 root root 4096 apr 28 21:33 uevent
--w------- 1 root root 4096 apr 28 21:33 unbind


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#StackBounty: #linux #linux-kernel #journald #scheduler #watchdog rcu_sched self-detected stall on CPU + watchdog: BUG: soft lockup – C…

Bounty: 50

Being unable to ssh into a machine I connected it to a monitor and found the following:

enter image description here

The machine is running Ubuntu Server 18.04 LTS and is a first generation 8 core Ryzen 1700. I’ve restarted the machine since and it works fine but am not sure what caused this in the first place and want to avoid it happening again.

enter image description here

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