#StackBounty: #linux #kernel #boot #linux-kernel #kernel-parameters Linux Modify/Add Kernel Command Line from InitramFS "UserSpace…

Bounty: 100

I am developing an embedded Linux device. I have successfully created an InitramFS CPIO archive that runs quickly after boot. Now, I want to change the initial kernel command line to include “quiet” parameter so I can boot even faster.

However, once the splash screen is displayed in the InitramFS, I want to remove the quiet option for the kernel so the remainder of the boot is NOT quiet.

How can I achieve this? How can I reverse the initial “quiet” kernel command line option once I’ve reached the InitramFS?

Thanks.


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#StackBounty: #linux #networking #lxc #container LXC container network speed issue

Bounty: 50

I am running openstack on LXC container and i found inside my LXC container network is very slow but from host its very fast

HOST

[root@ostack-infra-01 ~]# time wget http://mirror.cc.columbia.edu/pub/linux/centos/7.5.1804/updates/x86_64/repodata/0d7e660988dcc434ec5dec72067655f9b0ef44e6164d3fb85bda2bd1b09534db-primary.sqlite.bz2
--2018-08-04 00:24:09--  http://mirror.cc.columbia.edu/pub/linux/centos/7.5.1804/updates/x86_64/repodata/0d7e660988dcc434ec5dec72067655f9b0ef44e6164d3fb85bda2bd1b09534db-primary.sqlite.bz2
Resolving mirror.cc.columbia.edu (mirror.cc.columbia.edu)... 128.59.59.71
Connecting to mirror.cc.columbia.edu (mirror.cc.columbia.edu)|128.59.59.71|:80... connected.
HTTP request sent, awaiting response... 200 OK
Length: 4515677 (4.3M) [application/x-bzip2]
Saving to: ‘0d7e660988dcc434ec5dec72067655f9b0ef44e6164d3fb85bda2bd1b09534db-primary.sqlite.bz2’

100%[===========================================================================================================================================>] 4,515,677   23.1MB/s   in 0.2s

2018-08-04 00:24:09 (23.1 MB/s) - ‘0d7e660988dcc434ec5dec72067655f9b0ef44e6164d3fb85bda2bd1b09534db-primary.sqlite.bz2’ saved [4515677/4515677]


real    0m0.209s
user    0m0.008s
sys     0m0.014s

LXC container on same host

[root@ostack-infra-01 ~]# lxc-attach -n ostack-infra-01_neutron_server_container-fbf14420
[root@ostack-infra-01-neutron-server-container-fbf14420 ~]# time wget http://mirror.cc.columbia.edu/pub/linux/centos/7.5.1804/updates/x86_64/repodata/0d7e660988dcc434ec5dec72067655f9b0ef44e6164d3fb85bda2bd1b09534db-primary.sqlite.bz2
--2018-08-04 00:24:32--  http://mirror.cc.columbia.edu/pub/linux/centos/7.5.1804/updates/x86_64/repodata/0d7e660988dcc434ec5dec72067655f9b0ef44e6164d3fb85bda2bd1b09534db-primary.sqlite.bz2
Resolving mirror.cc.columbia.edu (mirror.cc.columbia.edu)... 128.59.59.71
Connecting to mirror.cc.columbia.edu (mirror.cc.columbia.edu)|128.59.59.71|:80... connected.
HTTP request sent, awaiting response... 200 OK
Length: 4515677 (4.3M) [application/x-bzip2]
Saving to: ‘0d7e660988dcc434ec5dec72067655f9b0ef44e6164d3fb85bda2bd1b09534db-primary.sqlite.bz2’

100%[===========================================================================================================================================>] 4,515,677   43.4KB/s   in 1m 58s

2018-08-04 00:26:31 (37.3 KB/s) - ‘0d7e660988dcc434ec5dec72067655f9b0ef44e6164d3fb85bda2bd1b09534db-primary.sqlite.bz2’ saved [4515677/4515677]


real    1m59.121s
user    0m0.002s
sys     0m0.361s

I don’t have any fancy configuration of any limit set for network, i have other host which is working fine and max speed, what do you think wrong here

kernel version Linux ostack-infra-01 3.10.0-862.3.3.el7.x86_64 #1 SMP

CentOS 7.5


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#StackBounty: #linux #display #gnome #gnome3 Re-enable screen blanking on gnome 3

Bounty: 50

Running Gnome 3.28. I am having problems with screen blanking. More specifically, the screen is not blanking, and I cannot figure out how to get it to blank consistently anymore. (Sometime, years ago, I killed screen blanking completely, and no longer have any idea how I did it.) Throughout this, when I refer to blanking, I specifically want/prefer DPMS off behavior.

Setting “Blank Screen” in the “Power” section of gnome-preferences does nothing. xset q returns the following:

DPMS (Energy Star):
  Standby: 0    Suspend: 0    Off: 0
  DPMS is Enabled
  Monitor is On

I can turn on screen blanking by using xset dpms 1200 2400 4800. This works. However, running any application that uses dbus to request inhibiting screen blanking (such as Youtube in chrome) causes the gnome power settings daemon to set these values back to zero, and never sets them back.

Tracing what is happening, starting, say, Youtube, sends an inhibit request to the SessionManager:

method call time=1533650079.657788 sender=:1.1216 -> destination=org.gnome.SessionManager serial=3 path=/org/gnome/SessionManager; interface=org.gnome.SessionManager; member=Inhibit
   string "/usr/bin/google-chrome-stable"
   uint32 0
   string "Playing video"
   uint32 12
signal time=1533650079.659445 sender=:1.14 -> destination=(null destination) serial=10679 path=/org/gnome/SessionManager; interface=org.gnome.SessionManager; member=InhibitorAdded
   object path "/org/gnome/SessionManager/Inhibitor975"
method return time=1533650079.659468 sender=:1.14 -> destination=:1.1216 serial=10680 reply_serial=3
   uint32 754926118
signal time=1533650079.659475 sender=:1.14 -> destination=(null destination) serial=10681 path=/org/gnome/SessionManager; interface=org.freedesktop.DBus.Properties; member=PropertiesChanged
   string "org.gnome.SessionManager"
   array [
      dict entry(
         string "InhibitedActions"
         variant             uint32 12
      )
   ]
   array [
   ]

This causes the gsd-power daemon to ask mutter to turn off power save mode:

method call time=1533650079.666562 sender=:1.36 -> destination=:1.16 serial=182 path=/org/gnome/Mutter/DisplayConfig; interface=org.freedesktop.DBus.Properties; member=Set
   string "org.gnome.Mutter.DisplayConfig"
   string "PowerSaveMode"
   variant       int32 0

which works, turning the DPMS settings to zeros. When I close the youtube session, I get a matching uninhibit request:

method call time=1533650081.283611 sender=:1.1216 -> destination=org.gnome.SessionManager serial=4 path=/org/gnome/SessionManager; interface=org.gnome.SessionManager; member=Uninhibit
   uint32 754926118
signal time=1533650081.286730 sender=:1.14 -> destination=(null destination) serial=10690 path=/org/gnome/SessionManager; interface=org.gnome.SessionManager; member=InhibitorRemoved
   object path "/org/gnome/SessionManager/Inhibitor975"
method call time=1533650081.286768 sender=:1.14 -> destination=org.freedesktop.DBus serial=10691 path=/org/freedesktop/DBus; interface=org.freedesktop.DBus; member=RemoveMatch
   string "type='signal',sender='org.freedesktop.DBus',interface='org.freedesktop.DBus',member='NameOwnerChanged',path='/org/freedesktop/DBus',arg0=':1.1216'"
method return time=1533650081.286778 sender=org.freedesktop.DBus -> destination=:1.14 serial=3032 reply_serial=10691
method return time=1533650081.286784 sender=:1.14 -> destination=:1.1216 serial=10692 reply_serial=4
signal time=1533650081.286789 sender=:1.14 -> destination=(null destination) serial=10693 path=/org/gnome/SessionManager; interface=org.freedesktop.DBus.Properties; member=PropertiesChanged
   string "org.gnome.SessionManager"
   array [
      dict entry(
         string "InhibitedActions"
         variant             uint32 4
      )
   ]
   array [
   ]

But nothing tells mutter to turn power save mode back on. What is normally supposed to do that, and what might prevent it from doing so?


Get this bounty!!!

#StackBounty: #linux #monitoring #atop What do "writes / reads issued" refer to in atop's DSK label?

Bounty: 50

Context: I’m writing a script that calculates a service’s I/O usage from atop history for the last 2 minutes (where atop’s sampling is configured to be per 1 minute).
I’m using the following command to generate the history file:

atop -P DSK,PRD -b [time] -e [time] -r > somefile_to_read_from

I’m using atop‘s parseable output option (-P) and the labels DSK and PRD.

From atop‘s manual page, it says this about DSK:

For every logical volume/multiple device/hard disk one line is shown.
Subsequent fields: name, number of milliseconds spent for I/O, number of reads issued, number of sectors transferred
for reads, number of writes issued, and number of sectors
transferred for write.

While for PRD it says:

For every process one line is shown.
Subsequent fields: PID, name (between brackets), state, obsoleted kernel patch installed (‘n’), standard io statistics
used (‘y’ or ‘n’), number of reads on disk, cumulative
number of sectors read, number of writes on disk, cumulative number of sectors written, cancelled number of written
sectors, TGID (group number of related tasks/threads) and
is_process (y/n).

I assumed they would be the same thing. However, I almost always get values way above 100% for the I/O usage (for example when running ab for apache). I thought that it would be a problem coming from my programming logic and algorithm, however, I banged my head in the wall for hours and couldn’t think of a mistake I might’ve done, tried a lot of different ways to calculate it, still getting the same results.

So then I opened and started reading the history file I generated line by line after filtering it to show me only the process that I’ve monitored to have such I/O usage (apache in this case, since I ran benchmarks on it). And I noticed something, that was the fact, that DSK‘s numbers of writes issued was way lower than the sum of all the apache’s PRD lines’ number of writes on disk.

I’m not sure if I’ve understood something wrong or what am I doing wrong. The history file is too large to show, however, I can upload it to something like pastebin if needed.

My questions is, what does DSK‘s numbers of writes/reads issued refer to, isn’t it the same as PRD‘s number of reads/writes on disk? And if not, what would be a way to calculate the I/O usage for a single process by using atop’s history?


Get this bounty!!!

#StackBounty: #linux #monitoring #atop What do "writes / reads issued" refer to in atop's DSK label?

Bounty: 50

Context: I’m writing a script that calculates a service’s I/O usage from atop history for the last 2 minutes (where atop’s sampling is configured to be per 1 minute).
I’m using the following command to generate the history file:

atop -P DSK,PRD -b [time] -e [time] -r > somefile_to_read_from

I’m using atop‘s parseable output option (-P) and the labels DSK and PRD.

From atop‘s manual page, it says this about DSK:

For every logical volume/multiple device/hard disk one line is shown.
Subsequent fields: name, number of milliseconds spent for I/O, number of reads issued, number of sectors transferred
for reads, number of writes issued, and number of sectors
transferred for write.

While for PRD it says:

For every process one line is shown.
Subsequent fields: PID, name (between brackets), state, obsoleted kernel patch installed (‘n’), standard io statistics
used (‘y’ or ‘n’), number of reads on disk, cumulative
number of sectors read, number of writes on disk, cumulative number of sectors written, cancelled number of written
sectors, TGID (group number of related tasks/threads) and
is_process (y/n).

I assumed they would be the same thing. However, I almost always get values way above 100% for the I/O usage (for example when running ab for apache). I thought that it would be a problem coming from my programming logic and algorithm, however, I banged my head in the wall for hours and couldn’t think of a mistake I might’ve done, tried a lot of different ways to calculate it, still getting the same results.

So then I opened and started reading the history file I generated line by line after filtering it to show me only the process that I’ve monitored to have such I/O usage (apache in this case, since I ran benchmarks on it). And I noticed something, that was the fact, that DSK‘s numbers of writes issued was way lower than the sum of all the apache’s PRD lines’ number of writes on disk.

I’m not sure if I’ve understood something wrong or what am I doing wrong. The history file is too large to show, however, I can upload it to something like pastebin if needed.

My questions is, what does DSK‘s numbers of writes/reads issued refer to, isn’t it the same as PRD‘s number of reads/writes on disk? And if not, what would be a way to calculate the I/O usage for a single process by using atop’s history?


Get this bounty!!!

#StackBounty: #linux #monitoring #atop What do "writes / reads issued" refer to in atop's DSK label?

Bounty: 50

Context: I’m writing a script that calculates a service’s I/O usage from atop history for the last 2 minutes (where atop’s sampling is configured to be per 1 minute).
I’m using the following command to generate the history file:

atop -P DSK,PRD -b [time] -e [time] -r > somefile_to_read_from

I’m using atop‘s parseable output option (-P) and the labels DSK and PRD.

From atop‘s manual page, it says this about DSK:

For every logical volume/multiple device/hard disk one line is shown.
Subsequent fields: name, number of milliseconds spent for I/O, number of reads issued, number of sectors transferred
for reads, number of writes issued, and number of sectors
transferred for write.

While for PRD it says:

For every process one line is shown.
Subsequent fields: PID, name (between brackets), state, obsoleted kernel patch installed (‘n’), standard io statistics
used (‘y’ or ‘n’), number of reads on disk, cumulative
number of sectors read, number of writes on disk, cumulative number of sectors written, cancelled number of written
sectors, TGID (group number of related tasks/threads) and
is_process (y/n).

I assumed they would be the same thing. However, I almost always get values way above 100% for the I/O usage (for example when running ab for apache). I thought that it would be a problem coming from my programming logic and algorithm, however, I banged my head in the wall for hours and couldn’t think of a mistake I might’ve done, tried a lot of different ways to calculate it, still getting the same results.

So then I opened and started reading the history file I generated line by line after filtering it to show me only the process that I’ve monitored to have such I/O usage (apache in this case, since I ran benchmarks on it). And I noticed something, that was the fact, that DSK‘s numbers of writes issued was way lower than the sum of all the apache’s PRD lines’ number of writes on disk.

I’m not sure if I’ve understood something wrong or what am I doing wrong. The history file is too large to show, however, I can upload it to something like pastebin if needed.

My questions is, what does DSK‘s numbers of writes/reads issued refer to, isn’t it the same as PRD‘s number of reads/writes on disk? And if not, what would be a way to calculate the I/O usage for a single process by using atop’s history?


Get this bounty!!!

#StackBounty: #linux #monitoring #atop What do "writes / reads issued" refer to in atop's DSK label?

Bounty: 50

Context: I’m writing a script that calculates a service’s I/O usage from atop history for the last 2 minutes (where atop’s sampling is configured to be per 1 minute).
I’m using the following command to generate the history file:

atop -P DSK,PRD -b [time] -e [time] -r > somefile_to_read_from

I’m using atop‘s parseable output option (-P) and the labels DSK and PRD.

From atop‘s manual page, it says this about DSK:

For every logical volume/multiple device/hard disk one line is shown.
Subsequent fields: name, number of milliseconds spent for I/O, number of reads issued, number of sectors transferred
for reads, number of writes issued, and number of sectors
transferred for write.

While for PRD it says:

For every process one line is shown.
Subsequent fields: PID, name (between brackets), state, obsoleted kernel patch installed (‘n’), standard io statistics
used (‘y’ or ‘n’), number of reads on disk, cumulative
number of sectors read, number of writes on disk, cumulative number of sectors written, cancelled number of written
sectors, TGID (group number of related tasks/threads) and
is_process (y/n).

I assumed they would be the same thing. However, I almost always get values way above 100% for the I/O usage (for example when running ab for apache). I thought that it would be a problem coming from my programming logic and algorithm, however, I banged my head in the wall for hours and couldn’t think of a mistake I might’ve done, tried a lot of different ways to calculate it, still getting the same results.

So then I opened and started reading the history file I generated line by line after filtering it to show me only the process that I’ve monitored to have such I/O usage (apache in this case, since I ran benchmarks on it). And I noticed something, that was the fact, that DSK‘s numbers of writes issued was way lower than the sum of all the apache’s PRD lines’ number of writes on disk.

I’m not sure if I’ve understood something wrong or what am I doing wrong. The history file is too large to show, however, I can upload it to something like pastebin if needed.

My questions is, what does DSK‘s numbers of writes/reads issued refer to, isn’t it the same as PRD‘s number of reads/writes on disk? And if not, what would be a way to calculate the I/O usage for a single process by using atop’s history?


Get this bounty!!!

#StackBounty: #linux #monitoring #atop What do "writes / reads issued" refer to in atop's DSK label?

Bounty: 50

Context: I’m writing a script that calculates a service’s I/O usage from atop history for the last 2 minutes (where atop’s sampling is configured to be per 1 minute).
I’m using the following command to generate the history file:

atop -P DSK,PRD -b [time] -e [time] -r > somefile_to_read_from

I’m using atop‘s parseable output option (-P) and the labels DSK and PRD.

From atop‘s manual page, it says this about DSK:

For every logical volume/multiple device/hard disk one line is shown.
Subsequent fields: name, number of milliseconds spent for I/O, number of reads issued, number of sectors transferred
for reads, number of writes issued, and number of sectors
transferred for write.

While for PRD it says:

For every process one line is shown.
Subsequent fields: PID, name (between brackets), state, obsoleted kernel patch installed (‘n’), standard io statistics
used (‘y’ or ‘n’), number of reads on disk, cumulative
number of sectors read, number of writes on disk, cumulative number of sectors written, cancelled number of written
sectors, TGID (group number of related tasks/threads) and
is_process (y/n).

I assumed they would be the same thing. However, I almost always get values way above 100% for the I/O usage (for example when running ab for apache). I thought that it would be a problem coming from my programming logic and algorithm, however, I banged my head in the wall for hours and couldn’t think of a mistake I might’ve done, tried a lot of different ways to calculate it, still getting the same results.

So then I opened and started reading the history file I generated line by line after filtering it to show me only the process that I’ve monitored to have such I/O usage (apache in this case, since I ran benchmarks on it). And I noticed something, that was the fact, that DSK‘s numbers of writes issued was way lower than the sum of all the apache’s PRD lines’ number of writes on disk.

I’m not sure if I’ve understood something wrong or what am I doing wrong. The history file is too large to show, however, I can upload it to something like pastebin if needed.

My questions is, what does DSK‘s numbers of writes/reads issued refer to, isn’t it the same as PRD‘s number of reads/writes on disk? And if not, what would be a way to calculate the I/O usage for a single process by using atop’s history?


Get this bounty!!!

#StackBounty: #linux #monitoring #atop What do "writes / reads issued" refer to in atop's DSK label?

Bounty: 50

Context: I’m writing a script that calculates a service’s I/O usage from atop history for the last 2 minutes (where atop’s sampling is configured to be per 1 minute).
I’m using the following command to generate the history file:

atop -P DSK,PRD -b [time] -e [time] -r > somefile_to_read_from

I’m using atop‘s parseable output option (-P) and the labels DSK and PRD.

From atop‘s manual page, it says this about DSK:

For every logical volume/multiple device/hard disk one line is shown.
Subsequent fields: name, number of milliseconds spent for I/O, number of reads issued, number of sectors transferred
for reads, number of writes issued, and number of sectors
transferred for write.

While for PRD it says:

For every process one line is shown.
Subsequent fields: PID, name (between brackets), state, obsoleted kernel patch installed (‘n’), standard io statistics
used (‘y’ or ‘n’), number of reads on disk, cumulative
number of sectors read, number of writes on disk, cumulative number of sectors written, cancelled number of written
sectors, TGID (group number of related tasks/threads) and
is_process (y/n).

I assumed they would be the same thing. However, I almost always get values way above 100% for the I/O usage (for example when running ab for apache). I thought that it would be a problem coming from my programming logic and algorithm, however, I banged my head in the wall for hours and couldn’t think of a mistake I might’ve done, tried a lot of different ways to calculate it, still getting the same results.

So then I opened and started reading the history file I generated line by line after filtering it to show me only the process that I’ve monitored to have such I/O usage (apache in this case, since I ran benchmarks on it). And I noticed something, that was the fact, that DSK‘s numbers of writes issued was way lower than the sum of all the apache’s PRD lines’ number of writes on disk.

I’m not sure if I’ve understood something wrong or what am I doing wrong. The history file is too large to show, however, I can upload it to something like pastebin if needed.

My questions is, what does DSK‘s numbers of writes/reads issued refer to, isn’t it the same as PRD‘s number of reads/writes on disk? And if not, what would be a way to calculate the I/O usage for a single process by using atop’s history?


Get this bounty!!!

#StackBounty: #linux #monitoring #atop What do "writes / reads issued" refer to in atop's DSK label?

Bounty: 50

Context: I’m writing a script that calculates a service’s I/O usage from atop history for the last 2 minutes (where atop’s sampling is configured to be per 1 minute).
I’m using the following command to generate the history file:

atop -P DSK,PRD -b [time] -e [time] -r > somefile_to_read_from

I’m using atop‘s parseable output option (-P) and the labels DSK and PRD.

From atop‘s manual page, it says this about DSK:

For every logical volume/multiple device/hard disk one line is shown.
Subsequent fields: name, number of milliseconds spent for I/O, number of reads issued, number of sectors transferred
for reads, number of writes issued, and number of sectors
transferred for write.

While for PRD it says:

For every process one line is shown.
Subsequent fields: PID, name (between brackets), state, obsoleted kernel patch installed (‘n’), standard io statistics
used (‘y’ or ‘n’), number of reads on disk, cumulative
number of sectors read, number of writes on disk, cumulative number of sectors written, cancelled number of written
sectors, TGID (group number of related tasks/threads) and
is_process (y/n).

I assumed they would be the same thing. However, I almost always get values way above 100% for the I/O usage (for example when running ab for apache). I thought that it would be a problem coming from my programming logic and algorithm, however, I banged my head in the wall for hours and couldn’t think of a mistake I might’ve done, tried a lot of different ways to calculate it, still getting the same results.

So then I opened and started reading the history file I generated line by line after filtering it to show me only the process that I’ve monitored to have such I/O usage (apache in this case, since I ran benchmarks on it). And I noticed something, that was the fact, that DSK‘s numbers of writes issued was way lower than the sum of all the apache’s PRD lines’ number of writes on disk.

I’m not sure if I’ve understood something wrong or what am I doing wrong. The history file is too large to show, however, I can upload it to something like pastebin if needed.

My questions is, what does DSK‘s numbers of writes/reads issued refer to, isn’t it the same as PRD‘s number of reads/writes on disk? And if not, what would be a way to calculate the I/O usage for a single process by using atop’s history?


Get this bounty!!!