#StackBounty: #windows #windows-10 #multi-boot Is there a difference between shutting down via Alt+F4 -> Shut down and Start menu -&…

Bounty: 100

I am noticing a weird issue: if I shut down using "Start menu -> Shut down", when I start Windows again it takes a lot of time (~6 minutes) to boot up. When I shutdown using "Alt+F4 -> Shut down", it boots up very fast.

I have fast startup turned on. I started noticing this only after I dual-booted with Linux Mint.

What is the reason behind the slow boot time when shutting down via "Start menu -> Shut down"?


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#StackBounty: #windows #windows-10 #multi-boot Is there a difference between shutting down via Alt+F4 -> Shut down and Start menu -&…

Bounty: 100

I am noticing a weird issue: if I shut down using "Start menu -> Shut down", when I start Windows again it takes a lot of time (~6 minutes) to boot up. When I shutdown using "Alt+F4 -> Shut down", it boots up very fast.

I have fast startup turned on. I started noticing this only after I dual-booted with Linux Mint.

What is the reason behind the slow boot time when shutting down via "Start menu -> Shut down"?


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#StackBounty: #linux #macos #multi-boot #uefi #hibernate On a dual-booted mac, can I hibernate from macos and resume on the other opera…

Bounty: 50

I have a dual-boot setup with MacOS and Arch Linux on my Macbook Pro mid-2009 17-inch.

I have rEFInd boot manager installed to my EFI System Partition as EFI/BOOT/bootx64.efi with a simple, nearly default config that allows me to choose Arch Linux or MacOS on boot. Awesome!

Arch Linux is loaded via EFI stub and I have the ability to hibernate and resume to it by using a swap file and kernel parameter resume=.... I can even hibernate Arch Linux, turn on the computer, choose MacOS through rEFInd (or even through the built in boot manager by holding the option key), which boots MacOS, and I can later shut down MacOS and resume Arch Linux from hibernate by selecting it in rEFInd at the next boot.

What I would love is to be able to do the same thing with my MacOS side, that is, hibernate MacOS, boot Arch Linux, to later resume MacOS. However it seems that when I sleep my MacOS side to hibernate (see man pmset for how to tell MacOS to hibernate), when I turn the power on, the resume process bypasses any boot selection I can make! That is, holding option doesn’t bring up the boot manager, and it begins MacOS resume right away.

I have tried ensuring that my EFI System Partition is the first choice of the boot manager by holding control and clicking the EFI System Partition at startup (after holding option to get into the boot manager), but this has no effect.

This page seems relevant, but doesn’t explicitly discuss what you can do with how MacOS bypasses the boot manager on hibernation resume.


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#StackBounty: #windows-7 #windows #multi-boot #bootloader #bootmgr Windows moved the bootloader to another drive

Bounty: 50

I have a dual boot install. I first installed Windows 7 in its own disk (C:) with the secondary drive disconnected. I did this because I know Windows has a tendency to mess with other drives. Then I connected a secondary drive and created a data partition (D:) and installed Linux in a third partition.

To sum up:

  • Disk 1: Windows partition (C:)
  • Disk 2: Data (D:), Linux (invisible from windows due to filesystem)

When Linux installed itself, it also installed GRUB in the second disk. So the Windows bootloader, which was installed in C:, wasn’t used. Still if in an emergency I disconnected the second disk or it failed, Windows 7 bootloader worked.

This has been working fine for years.

Now as part of a Windows Update this month, and I presume it is related to that update that nags you with the end of support message and a possible upgrade to Windows 10, Windows 7 has moved its own bootloader from C: to the data partition in the secondary disk (D:). There is now a bootmngr.exe and a Boot folder in D:, and there is none in C:.

Dual boot via GRUB is still working fine though, but I would like Windows’ own bootloader to stay in C: where it belongs. Will it suffice with copying bootmngr.exe and the Boot folder back to C:, or should I use Windows installation DVD to “repair” the Windows install? And If I fixed that disk alone, would the GRUB in the secondary disk still work?


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#StackBounty: #windows-7 #hard-drive #multi-boot #bootloader Windows 7 boot loader on a new drive?

Bounty: 50

We had a SATA3 drive that was performing poorly and making noise, and installed Windows 7 onto a new drive. The install went well, but left the bootloader on the old drive, and so I could not remove it; Windows treated it as a multi-boot system with a new boot option on the new disk. Everything worked, so I figured I’d have time to fix it. Well, the old drive died a few weeks later and now I have no idea how to address this.

How can I instruct the PC to boot to the new disk, when there isn’t a bootloader present on it? Do I need to reinstall Windows from scratch? From looking at the board specs, it supports UEFI, I am unsure if this is relevant.

Thanks!


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