#StackBounty: #ntfs mount.ntfs slowing computer without taking up CPU , showing "disk sleep"

Bounty: 50

I have two NTFS partitions mounted in my filesystem. One of them hosts my projects, so it is very important.

Every so often, my computer gets sluggish, sometimes to the point of almost freezing up. I noticed that whenever that happens, the process mount.ntfs shows disk sleep in the CPU column of the System Monitor ksysguard (see screenshot below).

Notably, in those situations, the memory is not running out, and the CPUs are not running at full capacity.

What are possible explanations for this and how can I fix it?

I run Kubuntu 19.04, 64-bit.

Screenshot


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#StackBounty: #ntfs #snapshot #windows-server-2019 #backup-restoration #deduplication Windows NTFS Data Deduplication and Snapshot Back…

Bounty: 100

We have a file server (fs00) on Google Cloud Platform (GCP):

  • Running Windows Server 2019 (with Desktop Experience installed).
  • One OS / System disk (250GB SSD)
  • An independent data disk (5TB standard tier)
  • Backups performed via disk snapshots with VSS coalescing enabled.

The data disk:

  • Is a "Basic" disk in the OS
  • GPT partition table
  • NTFS file system.
  • Has Data Deduplication enabled on the resulting volume / share
    • 5.8x space saving reported.

When trying to restore a backup, we’ve:

  • Created a new disk from a snapshot
  • Attached it to a fresh Windows Server 2019 VM (from the GCP base image).

The disk appears in "diskmgmt.msc", but doesn’t show correctly in Server Manager, only showing a the physical disk with no volumes, even after we "Online" the disk in either "diskmgmt" or Server Manager.

I can assign a drive letter and access most of the files (so far).

"Get-DedupStatus" shows nothing

The disk/volume doesn’t show in "Get-Volume" either.

Nothing is different after installing the Deduplication Feature

Or after starting the dedup service manually in "services.msc".

My question is: should I be able to enable the deduplication service and see the metadata?

I’m worried about getting this correct for a scenario where we need to restore EVERYTHING from backup and realising the snapshots are as good as useless.


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#StackBounty: #linux #partitioning #mount #ntfs Why ntfsusermap can't map all ntfs partition in my os?

Bounty: 300

sda4 and sda5 are all ntfs partition.

sudo blkid |grep ntfs
/dev/sda4: UUID="0042E54842E54350" TYPE="ntfs" PARTUUID="9f1dac15-dcb3-11ea-8492-d66553422507"
/dev/sda5: UUID="C0FC6E55FC6E462E" TYPE="ntfs" PARTUUID="1bb1cb5a-4418-41ce-8210-827072f17a47"

I can mount /dev/sda4.

sudo ntfsusermap /dev/sda4

enter image description here

Now start to mount /dev/sda5:

sudo ntfsusermap /dev/sda5

The output info:

This tool will help you to build a mapping of Windows users
to Linux users.
Be prepared to give Linux user id (uid) and group id (gid)
for owners of files which will be selected.
"/dev/sda5" opened

* Scanning "/dev/sda5" (two levels)
* Search for "Documents and Settings" and "Users"
* Search for other directories /
"/dev/sda5" closed

It can’t pop up User and Group to let me type in,why ntfsusermap can’t map all ntfs partition in my os?


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#StackBounty: #linux #partitioning #mount #ntfs Why ntfsusermap can't map all ntfs partition in my os?

Bounty: 300

sda4 and sda5 are all ntfs partition.

sudo blkid |grep ntfs
/dev/sda4: UUID="0042E54842E54350" TYPE="ntfs" PARTUUID="9f1dac15-dcb3-11ea-8492-d66553422507"
/dev/sda5: UUID="C0FC6E55FC6E462E" TYPE="ntfs" PARTUUID="1bb1cb5a-4418-41ce-8210-827072f17a47"

I can mount /dev/sda4.

sudo ntfsusermap /dev/sda4

enter image description here

Now start to mount /dev/sda5:

sudo ntfsusermap /dev/sda5

The output info:

This tool will help you to build a mapping of Windows users
to Linux users.
Be prepared to give Linux user id (uid) and group id (gid)
for owners of files which will be selected.
"/dev/sda5" opened

* Scanning "/dev/sda5" (two levels)
* Search for "Documents and Settings" and "Users"
* Search for other directories /
"/dev/sda5" closed

It can’t pop up User and Group to let me type in,why ntfsusermap can’t map all ntfs partition in my os?


Get this bounty!!!

#StackBounty: #linux #partitioning #mount #ntfs Why ntfsusermap can't map all ntfs partition in my os?

Bounty: 300

sda4 and sda5 are all ntfs partition.

sudo blkid |grep ntfs
/dev/sda4: UUID="0042E54842E54350" TYPE="ntfs" PARTUUID="9f1dac15-dcb3-11ea-8492-d66553422507"
/dev/sda5: UUID="C0FC6E55FC6E462E" TYPE="ntfs" PARTUUID="1bb1cb5a-4418-41ce-8210-827072f17a47"

I can mount /dev/sda4.

sudo ntfsusermap /dev/sda4

enter image description here

Now start to mount /dev/sda5:

sudo ntfsusermap /dev/sda5

The output info:

This tool will help you to build a mapping of Windows users
to Linux users.
Be prepared to give Linux user id (uid) and group id (gid)
for owners of files which will be selected.
"/dev/sda5" opened

* Scanning "/dev/sda5" (two levels)
* Search for "Documents and Settings" and "Users"
* Search for other directories /
"/dev/sda5" closed

It can’t pop up User and Group to let me type in,why ntfsusermap can’t map all ntfs partition in my os?


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#StackBounty: #windows-server-2008-r2 #ntfs #disk-volume What are $Extend$Deleted file system entries and how do I get rid of them?

Bounty: 50

I’d like to shrink an NTFS data partition on one of my servers. Unfortunately, it has an “unmovable file” located at an inconvenient position.

Here is the relevant event log entry:

A volume shrink analysis was initiated on volume Daten (C:Daten). This event log entry details information about the last unmovable file that could limit the maximum number of reclaimable bytes.

Diagnostic details:
– The last unmovable file appears to be:
$Extend$Deleted:$I30:$INDEX_ALLOCATION
– The last cluster of the file is: 0x1138f943
– Shrink potential target (LCN address): 0x18a51d6
– The NTFS file flags are: —-I
– Shrink phase: <analysis>

To find more details about this file please use the “fsutil volume querycluster \?Volume{4ad80633-d2d5-415e-97b4-9ad5f648bb0c} 0x1138f943” command.

The command mentioned at the bottom of the event log entry does not yield any useful additional information:

C:> fsutil volume querycluster \?Volume{4ad80633-d2d5-415e-97b4-9ad5f648bb0c} 0x1138f943
Cluster 0x000000001138f943 used by ----I $Extend$Deleted:$I30:$INDEX_ALLOCATION

(Note (note sure if it’s relevant): The last thing I did on the drive was to delete all shadow copies.)

I am aware that $Extend is not a “regular” folder but some kind of NTFS system file. Thus, my question:

What is this $Extend$Deleted file system entry and how do I get rid of it? (Or, at least, get rid of its “unmovability” so that I can shrink my volume…)


Get this bounty!!!

#StackBounty: #windows-server-2008-r2 #ntfs #disk-volume What are $Extend$Deleted file system entries and how do I get rid of them?

Bounty: 50

I’d like to shrink an NTFS data partition on one of my servers. Unfortunately, it has an “unmovable file” located at an inconvenient position.

Here is the relevant event log entry:

A volume shrink analysis was initiated on volume Daten (C:Daten). This event log entry details information about the last unmovable file that could limit the maximum number of reclaimable bytes.

Diagnostic details:
– The last unmovable file appears to be:
$Extend$Deleted:$I30:$INDEX_ALLOCATION
– The last cluster of the file is: 0x1138f943
– Shrink potential target (LCN address): 0x18a51d6
– The NTFS file flags are: —-I
– Shrink phase: <analysis>

To find more details about this file please use the “fsutil volume querycluster \?Volume{4ad80633-d2d5-415e-97b4-9ad5f648bb0c} 0x1138f943” command.

The command mentioned at the bottom of the event log entry does not yield any useful additional information:

C:> fsutil volume querycluster \?Volume{4ad80633-d2d5-415e-97b4-9ad5f648bb0c} 0x1138f943
Cluster 0x000000001138f943 used by ----I $Extend$Deleted:$I30:$INDEX_ALLOCATION

(Note (note sure if it’s relevant): The last thing I did on the drive was to delete all shadow copies.)

I am aware that $Extend is not a “regular” folder but some kind of NTFS system file. Thus, my question:

What is this $Extend$Deleted file system entry and how do I get rid of it? (Or, at least, get rid of its “unmovability” so that I can shrink my volume…)


Get this bounty!!!

#StackBounty: #windows-server-2008-r2 #ntfs #disk-volume What are $Extend$Deleted file system entries and how do I get rid of them?

Bounty: 50

I’d like to shrink an NTFS data partition on one of my servers. Unfortunately, it has an “unmovable file” located at an inconvenient position.

Here is the relevant event log entry:

A volume shrink analysis was initiated on volume Daten (C:Daten). This event log entry details information about the last unmovable file that could limit the maximum number of reclaimable bytes.

Diagnostic details:
– The last unmovable file appears to be:
$Extend$Deleted:$I30:$INDEX_ALLOCATION
– The last cluster of the file is: 0x1138f943
– Shrink potential target (LCN address): 0x18a51d6
– The NTFS file flags are: —-I
– Shrink phase: <analysis>

To find more details about this file please use the “fsutil volume querycluster \?Volume{4ad80633-d2d5-415e-97b4-9ad5f648bb0c} 0x1138f943” command.

The command mentioned at the bottom of the event log entry does not yield any useful additional information:

C:> fsutil volume querycluster \?Volume{4ad80633-d2d5-415e-97b4-9ad5f648bb0c} 0x1138f943
Cluster 0x000000001138f943 used by ----I $Extend$Deleted:$I30:$INDEX_ALLOCATION

(Note (note sure if it’s relevant): The last thing I did on the drive was to delete all shadow copies.)

I am aware that $Extend is not a “regular” folder but some kind of NTFS system file. Thus, my question:

What is this $Extend$Deleted file system entry and how do I get rid of it? (Or, at least, get rid of its “unmovability” so that I can shrink my volume…)


Get this bounty!!!

#StackBounty: #windows-server-2008-r2 #ntfs #disk-volume What are $Extend$Deleted file system entries and how do I get rid of them?

Bounty: 50

I’d like to shrink an NTFS data partition on one of my servers. Unfortunately, it has an “unmovable file” located at an inconvenient position.

Here is the relevant event log entry:

A volume shrink analysis was initiated on volume Daten (C:Daten). This event log entry details information about the last unmovable file that could limit the maximum number of reclaimable bytes.

Diagnostic details:
– The last unmovable file appears to be:
$Extend$Deleted:$I30:$INDEX_ALLOCATION
– The last cluster of the file is: 0x1138f943
– Shrink potential target (LCN address): 0x18a51d6
– The NTFS file flags are: —-I
– Shrink phase: <analysis>

To find more details about this file please use the “fsutil volume querycluster \?Volume{4ad80633-d2d5-415e-97b4-9ad5f648bb0c} 0x1138f943” command.

The command mentioned at the bottom of the event log entry does not yield any useful additional information:

C:> fsutil volume querycluster \?Volume{4ad80633-d2d5-415e-97b4-9ad5f648bb0c} 0x1138f943
Cluster 0x000000001138f943 used by ----I $Extend$Deleted:$I30:$INDEX_ALLOCATION

(Note (note sure if it’s relevant): The last thing I did on the drive was to delete all shadow copies.)

I am aware that $Extend is not a “regular” folder but some kind of NTFS system file. Thus, my question:

What is this $Extend$Deleted file system entry and how do I get rid of it? (Or, at least, get rid of its “unmovability” so that I can shrink my volume…)


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#StackBounty: #mount #hard-drive #ntfs NTFS Drobo External HDD not mounting properly

Bounty: 50

Looked around for hours, but can’t seem to find any advice better than “reformat it with ext3”:

I have a Drobo 5D with 20+ TB of usable space, most of which is used with very important data. It has been working flawlessly on Windows, but we’re trying to migrate our work over to Ubuntu for a variety of reasons, and the Drobo simply refuses to move with us. It’s formatted with NTFS, and I’m trying to mount it on a new Ubuntu 18.04 system.

Using drobo-utils, I can verify that the system is plugged in and looks ready to go, but when I try to mount it, the command just hangs:

sudo mount -t ntfs -o force,rw /dev/sdc2 /data/drobo

When I check the command later:

ps aux | grep mount
root     19309  0.0  0.0  72716  4280 pts/3    S    17:36   0:00 sudo mount -t ntfs -o force,rw /dev/sdc2 /data/drobo
root     19310  0.0  0.0  32448  1332 pts/3    S    17:36   0:00 mount -t ntfs -o force,rw /dev/sdc2 /data/drobo
root     19311  0.0  0.0  21428  2884 pts/3    D    17:36   0:00 /sbin/mount.ntfs /dev/sdc2 /data/drobo -o rw,force

Notice that the CPU time is at 0:00, so it doesn’t seem to be doing anything (this is an hour after issuing the command). I’ve pulled the drobo back off of linux and checked it out on Windows, and everything seems fine. There’s too much data on it to try reformatting it at this point. Is there anything particular about NTFS that would be causing this? Or is it an issue with the Drobo in general when using NTFS? Any help would be appreciated.


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