#StackBounty: #ubuntu #vnc #unity Access default unity desktop only over VNC connection

Bounty: 50

I installed Unity desktop on my cloud instance (18.04.1 x64)

sudo apt-get install ubuntu-desktop

and the VNC Server

sudo apt-get install vnc4server

What would be the contents of .vnc/xstartup file to invoke Unity desktop on a connection. I know for Gnome, its something like this :

unset SESSION_MANAGER
metacity &
gnome-settings-daemon &
gnome-panel &

But what about Unity? I only need it to be invoked over VNC connection, rest of the time GUI shouldn’t be taking up resources. Possible?

Help would be appreciated.


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#StackBounty: #texstudio #ubuntu #shortcut Texstudio Ctrl+Alt+Space shortcut not working on Ubuntu 18.04

Bounty: 50

I’m experiencing a similar problem to this question. Basically, Texstudio (tested versions 2.12.6 and 2.12.8) doesn’t recognize the combination Ctrl+Alt+Space. Other combinations seem to work.

The solution of creating the environment variable is not working, and it seems the problem is solved (except for not working on Ubuntu 18.04).

I asked the developers and seems that it is working as intended in Lubuntu, but not in Ubuntu.

I also checked the keyboard shortcuts on my system (Activities->Keyboard->Shortcuts) and there is no binding there.

How can I make the combination Ctrl+Alt+Space work under Ubuntu 18.04?

Details of System

$ lsb_release -a
No LSB modules are available.
Distributor ID: Ubuntu
Description:    Ubuntu 18.04 LTS
Release:    18.04
Codename:   bionic

$ gnome-shell --version
GNOME Shell 3.28.2

$ qmake --version
QMake version 3.1
Using Qt version 5.9.5 in /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu


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#StackBounty: #linux #ubuntu #permissions #python 'std::bad_alloc' after mistakenly changing /usr/ permissions

Bounty: 50

I’m working on a Linux machine running Ubuntu Bionic Beaver, release 18.04.

The other day I mistakenly changed the /usr/ directory to be owned by a user, instead of root. Unfortunately, I did that recursively, and so messed quite a bit of the system up because it also changed the suid permissions on some of the commands (e.g. passwd, sudo). We really can’t reinstall (well we can but it’ll cost!), so I booted from a LiveUSB, and changed manually all the correct user/group/permissions for each file that I could identify had a non-Root:Root User:Group. I did this by comparing the output of another Ubuntu computer of ls -lha /usr/.

It seems to be mostly fixed, but now I’m running into the error ‘std::bad_alloc’ after running some pretty standard python scripts. The strange part about this is that it only comes up sometimes. For example, if I open python from the command line and copy and paste code, the code will all run fine with no error. However if I run the entire script from the command line (e.g. python script.py) then I get this error. The full error message is:

terminate called after throwing an instance of 'std::bad_alloc'
what(): std::bad_alloc
Aborted (core dumped)

But to add another twist – sometimes I can run the same python script from the command line with no problem, and others I get this error as above.

If anybody has ideas as to where to specifically look to fix this that’d be great! I’m going to try and do the same thing as before but with the ls -lha /usr/ output from an 18.04 release, as I only had a 16 release output on hand.


Get this bounty!!!

#StackBounty: #linux #ubuntu #permissions #python 'std::bad_alloc' after mistakenly changing /usr/ permissions

Bounty: 50

I’m working on a Linux machine running Ubuntu Bionic Beaver, release 18.04.

The other day I mistakenly changed the /usr/ directory to be owned by a user, instead of root. Unfortunately, I did that recursively, and so messed quite a bit of the system up because it also changed the suid permissions on some of the commands (e.g. passwd, sudo). We really can’t reinstall (well we can but it’ll cost!), so I booted from a LiveUSB, and changed manually all the correct user/group/permissions for each file that I could identify had a non-Root:Root User:Group. I did this by comparing the output of another Ubuntu computer of ls -lha /usr/.

It seems to be mostly fixed, but now I’m running into the error ‘std::bad_alloc’ after running some pretty standard python scripts. The strange part about this is that it only comes up sometimes. For example, if I open python from the command line and copy and paste code, the code will all run fine with no error. However if I run the entire script from the command line (e.g. python script.py) then I get this error. The full error message is:

terminate called after throwing an instance of 'std::bad_alloc'
what(): std::bad_alloc
Aborted (core dumped)

But to add another twist – sometimes I can run the same python script from the command line with no problem, and others I get this error as above.

If anybody has ideas as to where to specifically look to fix this that’d be great! I’m going to try and do the same thing as before but with the ls -lha /usr/ output from an 18.04 release, as I only had a 16 release output on hand.


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#StackBounty: #ubuntu #virtualbox #shared-folders Virtual Box – Shared folder issue with Ubuntu 16.04

Bounty: 50

I have a Virtual Box GUI Version 5.1.14r112924 (Qt5.6.2) with a Guest OS Ubuntu-16.04.2 (64-bit) and as a host OS Windows 7 Enterprise.

My shared folder functionality and the ClipBoard mode used to work, but a few days ago, without an update from any component, the shared folder on my Guest OS was empty, while it was containing a lot of files on my host OS.

I installed the guest additions (5.2.8_KernelUbuntu r120774):

Session Information

And the folder is configured like this:

enter image description here

So the files from my C:/LocalData/Share should be available in /media/sf_Share/ but this is not the case 🙁

I tried to restart the Guest OS, update the Guest Additions from an ISO image (this also gave troubles):

enter image description here

I already tried to remove the Optical Drive from the Virtual Box and to read it, nothing helped. I could run the ISO from the mounted drive, but this also gave me an issue:

Because it was still mounted I could install it from there but it gave me errors.

What did work be to install them using apt-get:

sudo apt-get install virtualbox-guest-additions-iso

I also made sure that my user is added to the vboxsf group

sudo usermod -G vboxsf -a

And the rights are ok on the folder:

enter image description here

This installed them, but I cannot find a way to access the files on my host OS 🙁

I put a lot of effort into setting up my guest OS and configuring everything. I want to avoid to start over the config just for not being able to share files and copy text between host and guest OS.

Is there something else I could try?


Get this bounty!!!

#StackBounty: #linux #ubuntu #permissions #python 'std::bad_alloc' after mistakenly changing /usr/ permissions

Bounty: 50

I’m working on a Linux machine running Ubuntu Bionic Beaver, release 18.04.

The other day I mistakenly changed the /usr/ directory to be owned by a user, instead of root. Unfortunately, I did that recursively, and so messed quite a bit of the system up because it also changed the suid permissions on some of the commands (e.g. passwd, sudo). We really can’t reinstall (well we can but it’ll cost!), so I booted from a LiveUSB, and changed manually all the correct user/group/permissions for each file that I could identify had a non-Root:Root User:Group. I did this by comparing the output of another Ubuntu computer of ls -lha /usr/.

It seems to be mostly fixed, but now I’m running into the error ‘std::bad_alloc’ after running some pretty standard python scripts. The strange part about this is that it only comes up sometimes. For example, if I open python from the command line and copy and paste code, the code will all run fine with no error. However if I run the entire script from the command line (e.g. python script.py) then I get this error. The full error message is:

terminate called after throwing an instance of 'std::bad_alloc'
what(): std::bad_alloc
Aborted (core dumped)

But to add another twist – sometimes I can run the same python script from the command line with no problem, and others I get this error as above.

If anybody has ideas as to where to specifically look to fix this that’d be great! I’m going to try and do the same thing as before but with the ls -lha /usr/ output from an 18.04 release, as I only had a 16 release output on hand.


Get this bounty!!!

#StackBounty: #linux #ubuntu #permissions #python 'std::bad_alloc' after mistakenly changing /usr/ permissions

Bounty: 50

I’m working on a Linux machine running Ubuntu Bionic Beaver, release 18.04.

The other day I mistakenly changed the /usr/ directory to be owned by a user, instead of root. Unfortunately, I did that recursively, and so messed quite a bit of the system up because it also changed the suid permissions on some of the commands (e.g. passwd, sudo). We really can’t reinstall (well we can but it’ll cost!), so I booted from a LiveUSB, and changed manually all the correct user/group/permissions for each file that I could identify had a non-Root:Root User:Group. I did this by comparing the output of another Ubuntu computer of ls -lha /usr/.

It seems to be mostly fixed, but now I’m running into the error ‘std::bad_alloc’ after running some pretty standard python scripts. The strange part about this is that it only comes up sometimes. For example, if I open python from the command line and copy and paste code, the code will all run fine with no error. However if I run the entire script from the command line (e.g. python script.py) then I get this error. The full error message is:

terminate called after throwing an instance of 'std::bad_alloc'
what(): std::bad_alloc
Aborted (core dumped)

But to add another twist – sometimes I can run the same python script from the command line with no problem, and others I get this error as above.

If anybody has ideas as to where to specifically look to fix this that’d be great! I’m going to try and do the same thing as before but with the ls -lha /usr/ output from an 18.04 release, as I only had a 16 release output on hand.


Get this bounty!!!

#StackBounty: #linux #ubuntu #permissions #python 'std::bad_alloc' after mistakenly changing /usr/ permissions

Bounty: 50

I’m working on a Linux machine running Ubuntu Bionic Beaver, release 18.04.

The other day I mistakenly changed the /usr/ directory to be owned by a user, instead of root. Unfortunately, I did that recursively, and so messed quite a bit of the system up because it also changed the suid permissions on some of the commands (e.g. passwd, sudo). We really can’t reinstall (well we can but it’ll cost!), so I booted from a LiveUSB, and changed manually all the correct user/group/permissions for each file that I could identify had a non-Root:Root User:Group. I did this by comparing the output of another Ubuntu computer of ls -lha /usr/.

It seems to be mostly fixed, but now I’m running into the error ‘std::bad_alloc’ after running some pretty standard python scripts. The strange part about this is that it only comes up sometimes. For example, if I open python from the command line and copy and paste code, the code will all run fine with no error. However if I run the entire script from the command line (e.g. python script.py) then I get this error. The full error message is:

terminate called after throwing an instance of 'std::bad_alloc'
what(): std::bad_alloc
Aborted (core dumped)

But to add another twist – sometimes I can run the same python script from the command line with no problem, and others I get this error as above.

If anybody has ideas as to where to specifically look to fix this that’d be great! I’m going to try and do the same thing as before but with the ls -lha /usr/ output from an 18.04 release, as I only had a 16 release output on hand.


Get this bounty!!!

#StackBounty: #linux #ubuntu #permissions #python 'std::bad_alloc' after mistakenly changing /usr/ permissions

Bounty: 50

I’m working on a Linux machine running Ubuntu Bionic Beaver, release 18.04.

The other day I mistakenly changed the /usr/ directory to be owned by a user, instead of root. Unfortunately, I did that recursively, and so messed quite a bit of the system up because it also changed the suid permissions on some of the commands (e.g. passwd, sudo). We really can’t reinstall (well we can but it’ll cost!), so I booted from a LiveUSB, and changed manually all the correct user/group/permissions for each file that I could identify had a non-Root:Root User:Group. I did this by comparing the output of another Ubuntu computer of ls -lha /usr/.

It seems to be mostly fixed, but now I’m running into the error ‘std::bad_alloc’ after running some pretty standard python scripts. The strange part about this is that it only comes up sometimes. For example, if I open python from the command line and copy and paste code, the code will all run fine with no error. However if I run the entire script from the command line (e.g. python script.py) then I get this error. The full error message is:

terminate called after throwing an instance of 'std::bad_alloc'
what(): std::bad_alloc
Aborted (core dumped)

But to add another twist – sometimes I can run the same python script from the command line with no problem, and others I get this error as above.

If anybody has ideas as to where to specifically look to fix this that’d be great! I’m going to try and do the same thing as before but with the ls -lha /usr/ output from an 18.04 release, as I only had a 16 release output on hand.


Get this bounty!!!

#StackBounty: #linux #ubuntu #permissions #python 'std::bad_alloc' after mistakenly changing /usr/ permissions

Bounty: 50

I’m working on a Linux machine running Ubuntu Bionic Beaver, release 18.04.

The other day I mistakenly changed the /usr/ directory to be owned by a user, instead of root. Unfortunately, I did that recursively, and so messed quite a bit of the system up because it also changed the suid permissions on some of the commands (e.g. passwd, sudo). We really can’t reinstall (well we can but it’ll cost!), so I booted from a LiveUSB, and changed manually all the correct user/group/permissions for each file that I could identify had a non-Root:Root User:Group. I did this by comparing the output of another Ubuntu computer of ls -lha /usr/.

It seems to be mostly fixed, but now I’m running into the error ‘std::bad_alloc’ after running some pretty standard python scripts. The strange part about this is that it only comes up sometimes. For example, if I open python from the command line and copy and paste code, the code will all run fine with no error. However if I run the entire script from the command line (e.g. python script.py) then I get this error. The full error message is:

terminate called after throwing an instance of 'std::bad_alloc'
what(): std::bad_alloc
Aborted (core dumped)

But to add another twist – sometimes I can run the same python script from the command line with no problem, and others I get this error as above.

If anybody has ideas as to where to specifically look to fix this that’d be great! I’m going to try and do the same thing as before but with the ls -lha /usr/ output from an 18.04 release, as I only had a 16 release output on hand.


Get this bounty!!!